The Tale of a Niggun

The Tale of a Niggun
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 64
ISBN: 9780805243642
Release: 2020-11-17
Editor: Schocken

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Elie Wiesel’s heartbreaking narrative poem about history, immortality, and the power of song, accompanied by magnificent full-color illustrations by award-winning artist Mark Podwal. Based on an actual event that occurred during World War II. It is the evening before the holiday of Purim, and the Nazis have given the ghetto’s leaders twenty-four hours to turn over ten Jews to be hanged to “avenge” the deaths of the ten sons of Haman, the villain of the Purim story, which celebrates the triumph of the Jews of Persia over potential genocide some 2,400 years ago. If the leaders refuse, the entire ghetto will be liquidated. Terrified, they go to the ghetto’s rabbi for advice; he tells them to return the next morning. Over the course of the night the rabbi calls up the spirits of legendary rabbis from centuries past for advice on what to do, but no one can give him a satisfactory answer. The eighteenth-century mystic and founder of Hasidism, the Baal Shem Tov, tries to intercede with God by singing a niggun—a wordless, joyful melody with the power to break the chains of evil. The next evening, when no volunteers step forward, the ghetto’s residents are informed that in an hour they will all be killed. As the minutes tick by, the ghetto’s rabbi teaches his assembled community the song that the Baal Shem Tov had sung the night before. And then the voices of these men, women, and children soar to the heavens. How can the heavens not hear?

Niggun

Niggun
Available:
Author: Mordechai Staiman
Pages: 293
ISBN: UOM:39015032917075
Release: 1994
Editor: Jason Aronson Incorporated

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

To find more information on Rowman & Littlefield titles, please visit us at www.rowmanlittlefield.com.

The Full Pomegranate

The Full Pomegranate
Available:
Author: Avrom Sutzkever
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781438472508
Release: 2018-12-31
Editor: SUNY Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Translations of selected poems by the Yiddish writer, covering the entire breadth of his career. Yiddish writer Avrom Sutzkever (1913–2010) was described by the New York Times as “the greatest poet of the Holocaust.” Born in present-day Belarus, Sutzkever spent his childhood as a war refugee in Siberia, returned to Poland to participate in the interwar flourishing of Yiddish culture, was confined to the Vilna ghetto during the Nazi occupation, escaped to join the Jewish partisans, and settled in the new state of Israel after the war. Personal and political, mystical and national, his body of work, including more than two dozen volumes of poetry, several of stories, and a memoir, demonstrated the ways in which Yiddish creativity simultaneously balanced the imperatives of mourning and revival after the Holocaust. In The Full Pomegranate, Richard J. Fein selects and translates some of Sutzkever’s best poems covering the full breadth of his career. Fein’s translations appear alongside the original Yiddish, while an introduction by Justin Cammy situates Sutzkever in both historical and literary context. “Richard Fein is among the best translators of Yiddish poetry into English—the best now, and, for that matter, among the best ever. He has a deep, inward sense of Yiddish poems, both intuitive and analytic, and a patient tenacity in burrowing into them. He also has what is still rarer, a beautifully fine ear for diction and rhythm; the translations are alive on the page, every word is necessary, every cadence has its music. “The poems of Avrom Sutzkever were a challenge to him; he writes, candidly, ‘they wanted me to find new powers in my English.’ There is a special, precious audacity in accepting such a challenge, and Fein has indeed found the new powers the poems demanded.” — Lawrence Rosenwald, Wellesley College PRAISE FOR THE FULL POMEGRANATE “Avrom Sutzkever has no more loving translator than fellow poet Richard Fein. Even those who think they ‘do not understand poetry’ will be inspired by the poet who bore witness to the most dramatic points of modern Jewish experience and could transmit their power. Strength and spirit fuse in Sutzkever, wit and insight, moral confidence and grace. Our thanks to the translator and to Justin Cammy’s introduction for bringing this Jewish cultural landmark to English readers.” — Ruth R. Wisse, author of No Joke: Making Jewish Humor “Richard Fein’s translations strive for the impossible acrobatics of Sutzkever’s writing, from the rare alchemy of his striking metaphors to a postwar longing for poetic redemption in the face of destruction. To capture just an echo of Sutzkever’s singular voice would be an achievement. This collection, simultaneously careful and daring in its choices, amplifies that echo to the maximum that the English language would allow.” — Saul Noam Zaritt, Harvard University “In dialogue with Avrom Sutzkever, Richard Fein offers us a vibrant selection of the poet’s works in a beautiful facing-page translation. Sutzkever’s superbly inventive Yiddish imagery and wordcraft inspired Fein, the poet-translator, to dynamically engage both Yiddish and English, with remarkable and moving results.” — Ellen Kellman, Brandeis University

The Address Book

The Address Book
Available:
Author: Deirdre Mask
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781250134783
Release: 2020-04-14
Editor: St. Martin's Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Finalist for the 2020 Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction | One of Time Magazines's 100 Must-Read Books of 2020 | Longlisted for the 2020 Porchlight Business Book Awards "An entertaining quest to trace the origins and implications of the names of the roads on which we reside." —Sarah Vowell, The New York Times Book Review When most people think about street addresses, if they think of them at all, it is in their capacity to ensure that the postman can deliver mail or a traveler won’t get lost. But street addresses were not invented to help you find your way; they were created to find you. In many parts of the world, your address can reveal your race and class. In this wide-ranging and remarkable book, Deirdre Mask looks at the fate of streets named after Martin Luther King Jr., the wayfinding means of ancient Romans, and how Nazis haunt the streets of modern Germany. The flipside of having an address is not having one, and we also see what that means for millions of people today, including those who live in the slums of Kolkata and on the streets of London. Filled with fascinating people and histories, The Address Book illuminates the complex and sometimes hidden stories behind street names and their power to name, to hide, to decide who counts, who doesn’t—and why.

Legends of Our Time

Legends of Our Time
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9780307806413
Release: 2011-09-07
Editor: Schocken

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A collection of tales immortalizing the heroic deeds and visions of people Wiesel knew during and after World War II.

28 Days A Novel of Resistance in the Warsaw Ghetto

28 Days  A Novel of Resistance in the Warsaw Ghetto
Available:
Author: David Safier
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781250237156
Release: 2020-03-10
Editor: Feiwel & Friends

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Inspired by true events, David Safier's 28 Days: A Novel of Resistance in the Warsaw Ghetto is a harrowing historical YA that chronicles the brutality of the Holocaust. Warsaw, 1942. Sixteen-year old Mira smuggles food into the Ghetto to keep herself and her family alive. When she discovers that the entire Ghetto is to be "liquidated"—killed or "resettled" to concentration camps—she desperately tries to find a way to save her family. She meets a group of young people who are planning the unthinkable: an uprising against the occupying forces. Mira joins the resistance fighters who, with minimal supplies and weapons, end up holding out for twenty-eight days, longer than anyone had thought possible.

Open Heart

Open Heart
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 96
ISBN: 9780805212587
Release: 2015-09-29
Editor: Schocken

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The author, at age eighty-two, was told that he needed immediate surgery to clear his blocked arteries. On what he knew might very well be his deathbed, he reflected on his many losses and accomplishments, and on all that remained to be done. Fortunately, he survived the life-threatening heart surgery to turn those reflections into a book which discusses his affection for his family both departed and still living, his aspirations for his writing, and his hope that he improved the world

The Book of Unconformities

The Book of Unconformities
Available:
Author: Hugh Raffles
Pages: 400
ISBN: 9780804198011
Release: 2020-08-25
Editor: Pantheon

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

From the author of the acclaimed Insectopedia, a powerful exploration of loss, endurance, and the absences that permeate the present When Hugh Raffles’s two sisters died suddenly within a few weeks of each other, he reached for rocks, stones, and other seemingly solid objects as anchors in a world unmoored, as ways to make sense of these events through stories far larger than his own. A moving, profound, and affirming meditation, The Book of Unconformities is grounded in stories of stones: Neolithic stone circles, Icelandic lava, mica from a Nazi concentration camp, petrified whale blubber in Svalbard, the marble prized by Manhattan’s Lenape, and a huge Greenlandic meteorite that arrived with six Inuit adventurers in the exuberant but fractious New York City of 1897. As Raffles follows these fundamental objects, unearthing the events they’ve engendered, he finds them losing their solidity and becoming as capricious, indifferent, and willful as time itself.

The Poisoned City

The Poisoned City
Available:
Author: Anna Clark
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781250125156
Release: 2018-07-10
Editor: Metropolitan Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

When the people of Flint, Michigan, turned on their faucets in April 2014, the water pouring out was poisoned with lead and other toxins. Through a series of disastrous decisions, the state government had switched the city’s water supply to a source that corroded Flint’s aging lead pipes. Complaints about the foul-smelling water were dismissed: the residents of Flint, mostly poor and African American, were not seen as credible, even in matters of their own lives. It took eighteen months of activism by city residents and a band of dogged outsiders to force the state to admit that the water was poisonous. By that time, twelve people had died and Flint’s children had suffered irreparable harm. The long battle for accountability and a humane response to this man-made disaster has only just begun. In the first full account of this American tragedy, Anna Clark's The Poisoned City recounts the gripping story of Flint’s poisoned water through the people who caused it, suffered from it, and exposed it. It is a chronicle of one town, but could also be about any American city, all made precarious by the neglect of infrastructure and the erosion of democratic decision making. Places like Flint are set up to fail—and for the people who live and work in them, the consequences can be fatal.

The Wondering Jew

The Wondering Jew
Available:
Author: Micah Goodman
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9780300252248
Release: 2020-11-10
Editor: Yale University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A celebrated Israeli author explores the roots of the divide between religion and secularism in Israel today, and offers a path to bridging the divide "A thoughtful social, political, and philosophical examination of Judaism. . . . A cogent consideration of the place of religion in the modern world."--Kirkus Reviews Zionism began as a movement full of contradictions, between a pull to the past and a desire to forge a new future. Israel has become a place of fragmentation, between those who sanctify religious tradition and those who wish to escape its grasp. Now, a new middle ground is emerging between religious and secular Jews who want to engage with their heritage--without being restricted by it or losing it completely. In this incisive book, acclaimed author Micah Goodman explores Israeli Judaism and the conflict between religion and secularism, one of the major causes of political polarization throughout the world. Revisiting traditional religious sources and seminal works of secularism, he reveals that each contains an openness to learn from the other's messages. Goodman challenges both orthodoxies, proposing a new approach to bridge the divide between religion and secularism and pave a path toward healing a society torn asunder by extremism.

Fight of the Century

Fight of the Century
Available:
Author: Viet Thanh Nguyen,Jacqueline woodson,Ann Patchett,Brit Bennett,Steven Okazaki,David Handler,Geraldine Brooks,Yaa Gyasi,Sergio De La Pava,Dave Eggers,Timothy Egan,Li Yiyun,Meg Wolitzer,Hector Tobar,Aleksandar Hemon,Elizabeth Strout,Rabih Alameddine,Moriel Rothman-Zecher,Jonathan Lethem,Salman Rushdie,Lauren Groff,Jennifer Egan,Scott Turow,Morgan Parker,Victor Lavalle,Michael Cunningham,Neil Gaiman,Jesmyn Ward,Moses Sumney,George Saunders,Marlon James,William Finnegan,Anthony Doerr,C.J. Anders,Brenda J. Childs,Andrew Sean Greer,Louise Erdrich,Adrian Nicole LeBlanc
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9781501190414
Release: 2021-01-19
Editor: Avid Reader Press / Simon & Schuster

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The American Civil Liberties Union partners with award-winning authors Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman in this “forceful, beautifully written” (Associated Press) collection that brings together many of our greatest living writers, each contributing an original piece inspired by a historic ACLU case. On January 19, 1920, a small group of idealists and visionaries, including Helen Keller, Jane Addams, Roger Baldwin, and Crystal Eastman, founded the American Civil Liberties Union. A century after its creation, the ACLU remains the nation’s premier defender of the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution. In collaboration with the ACLU, authors Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman have curated an anthology of essays “full of struggle, emotion, fear, resilience, hope, and triumph” (Los Angeles Review of Books) about landmark cases in the organization’s one-hundred-year history. Fight of the Century takes you inside the trials and the stories that have shaped modern life. Some of the most prominent cases that the ACLU has been involved in—Brown v. Board of Education, Roe v. Wade, Miranda v. Arizona—need little introduction. Others you may never even have heard of, yet their outcomes quietly defined the world we live in now. Familiar or little-known, each case springs to vivid life in the hands of the acclaimed writers who dive into the history, narrate their personal experiences, and debate the questions at the heart of each issue. Hector Tobar introduces us to Ernesto Miranda, the felon whose wrongful conviction inspired the now-iconic Miranda rights—which the police would later read to the man suspected of killing him. Yaa Gyasi confronts the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education, in which the ACLU submitted a friend of- the-court brief questioning why a nation that has sent men to the moon still has public schools so unequal that they may as well be on different planets. True to the ACLU’s spirit of principled dissent, Scott Turow offers a blistering critique of the ACLU’s stance on campaign finance. These powerful stories, along with essays from Neil Gaiman, Meg Wolitzer, Salman Rushdie, Ann Patchett, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Louise Erdrich, George Saunders, and many more, remind us that the issues the ACLU has engaged over the past one hundred years remain as vital as ever today, and that we can never take our liberties for granted. Chabon and Waldman are donating their advance to the ACLU and the contributors are forgoing payment.

A Book of Hebrew Letters

A Book of Hebrew Letters
Available:
Author: Mark H. Podwal
Pages: 64
ISBN: 0876683170
Release: 1992
Editor: Jason Aronson Incorporated

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The twenty-two letters of the Hebrew alphabet are not considered by the Jewish sages to be merely forms that make up words, but rather the fundamental elements that the Almighty uses to create the world. Throughout the centuries these letters have also served to release a well of Jewish creativity. Their graphic beauty and the rich folklore that surrounds them have inspired generations of Jewish artists to sublime efforts. This collection of drawings is such an achievement. Working in a mode that combines traditional Jewish styles with his own distinctive line and vision, Mark Podwal has conceived this series of twenty-two drawings, each illustrating, in Hebrew alphabetic sequence, a term deriving from Jewish tradition and experience. Thus for aleph, the first letter, the artist has chosen to portray Aleph-Beth (alphabet), a fitting introduction to this Book of Hebrew Letters. Tav, the last letter, is represented by Torah. In between are such pictures as Tallit (prayer shawl) for the letter teth, Megillah (scroll) for mem, and Shalom (peace) for shin. Dr. Mark Podwal has distinguished himself as one of the most creative and inventive Jewish artists of our time. His work appears regularly in The New York Times and has been reproduced in publications here and abroad. Dr. Podwal has also collaborated with Elie Wiesel on many projects, creating the drawings for a number of Mr. Wiesel's books. In addition, the Congressional Gold Medal that President Ronald Reagan presented to Elie Wiesel was designed by Dr. Podwal. The drawings in A Book of Hebrew Letters, accompanied by the artist's calligraphy - and enhanced by his illuminating notes - together form a cluster of visual metaphors that will both delight the eye and intrigue the mind.

Thinking about God

Thinking about God
Available:
Author: Kari H. Tuling
Pages: 424
ISBN: 9780827613010
Release: 2020
Editor: JPS Essential Judaism

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Investigating how Jewish thinkers from the biblical to the postmodern era have approached questions about God and highlighting interplays between texts over time, Rabbi Kari H. Tuling elucidates many compelling--and contrasting--ways to think about God in Jewish tradition.

Jew Today

Jew Today
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 260
ISBN: 9780307759702
Release: 2010-09-22
Editor: Vintage

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In this powerful and wide-ranging collection of essays, letters and diary entries, weaving together all the periods of the author's life -- from his childhood in Transylvania to Auschwitz and Buchenwald, Paris, New York -- Elie Wiesel, acclaimed as one of the most gifted and sensitive writers of our time, probes, from the particular point of view of his Jewishness, such central moral and political issues as Zionism and the Middle East conflict, Solzhenitsyn and Soviet anti-Semitism, the obligations of American Jews toward Israel, the Holocaust and its cheapening in the media.

The Time of the Uprooted

The Time of the Uprooted
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 299
ISBN: 9780805211771
Release: 2007
Editor: Random House Digital, Inc.

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Tormented by feelings of loss and dispossession after spending his life fleeing first the Nazis and then the 1956 Russian invasion of Hungary, Gamaliel Friedman finally settles in New York, where he works as a ghostwriter and meets a fellow group of exiles, which includes a rabbi whose mystical beliefs finally offer him a chance to reconcile with the past. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

Dawn

Dawn
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 96
ISBN: 9781466821163
Release: 2006-03-21
Editor: Hill and Wang

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"The author...has built knowledge into artistic fiction."—The New York Times Book Review Elisha is a young Jewish man, a Holocaust survivor, and an Israeli freedom fighter in British-controlled Palestine; John Dawson is the captured English officer he will murder at dawn in retribution for the British execution of a fellow freedom fighter. The night-long wait for morning and death provides Dawn, Elie Wiesel's ever more timely novel, with its harrowingly taut, hour-by-hour narrative. Caught between the manifold horrors of the past and the troubling dilemmas of the present, Elisha wrestles with guilt, ghosts, and ultimately God as he waits for the appointed hour and his act of assassination. Dawn is an eloquent meditation on the compromises, justifications, and sacrifices that human beings make when they murder other human beings.

A Beggar in Jerusalem

A Beggar in Jerusalem
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9780307833808
Release: 2013-02-13
Editor: Schocken

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

When the Six-Day War began, Elie Wiesel rushed to Israel. "I went to Jerusalem because I had to go somewhere, I had to leave the present and bring it back to the past. You see, the man who came to Jerusalem then came as a beggar, a madman, not believing his eyes and ears, and above all, his memory." This haunting novel takes place in the days following the Six-Day War. A Holocaust survivor visits the newly reunited city of Jerusalem. At the Western Wall he encounters the beggars and madmen who congregate there every evening, and who force him to confront the ghosts of his past and his ties to the present. Weaving together myth and mystery, parable and paradox, Wiesel bids the reader to join him on a spiritual journey back and forth in time, always returning to Jerusalem.

Witness

Witness
Available:
Author: Ariel Burger
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781328802699
Release: 2018
Editor: Houghton Mifflin

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"In the vein of Tuesdays with Morrie, a devoted protaegae and friend of one of the world's great thinkers takes us into the sacred space of the classroom, showing Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elie Wiesel not only as an extraordinary human being, but as a master teacher"--

The Forgotten

The Forgotten
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780307806420
Release: 2011-09-14
Editor: Schocken

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Distinguished psychotherapist and survivor Elhanan Rosenbaum is losing his memory to an incurable disease. Never having spoken of the war years before, he resolves to tell his son about his past—the heroic parts as well as the parts that fill him with shame—before it is too late. Elhanan's story compels his son to go to the Romanian village where the crime that continues to haunt his father was committed. There he encounters the improbable wisdom of a gravedigger who leads him to the grave of his grandfather and to the truths that bind one generation to another.

Messengers of God

Messengers of God
Available:
Author: Elie Wiesel
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781476737676
Release: 2013-02-12
Editor: Simon and Schuster

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Elie Wiesel’s classic look at Job and seven other Biblical characters as they grapple with their relationship with God and the question of his justice. “Wiesel has never allowed himself to be diverted from the role of witness for the martyred Jews and survivors of the Holocaust, and by extension for all those who through the centuries have asked Job's question: ‘What is God doing and where is His justice?’ Here in a masterful series of mythic portraits, drawing upon Bible tales and the Midrashim (a body of commentary), Wiesel explores ‘the distant and haunting figures that molded him’: Adam, Cain and Abel, Abraham and Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, and Job. With the dramatic invention of a Father Mapple and the exquisite care of a Talmudic scholar, Wiesel interprets the wellsprings of Jewish religious tradition as the many faces of man’s greatness facing the inexplicable. In an intimate relationship with God it is possible to complain, to demand. Adam and Eve in sinning “cried out” against the injustice of their entrapment; Cain assaulted God rather than his brother; and Abraham's agreement to sacrifice his son placed the burden of guilt on Him who demanded it. As for Job, Wiesel concludes that he abdicated his defiance as did the confessing Communists of Stalin’s time to ‘underline the implausibility’ of his trial, and thus become the accuser. Wiesel’s concern with the imponderables of fate seems to move from strength to strength” (Kirkus Reviews).