Genre : Social Science
Editor : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release : 1998-09-30
ISBN-13 : 1429931116
Hardcover : 352 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction When three-month-old Lia Lee Arrived at the county hospital emergency room in Merced, California, a chain of events was set in motion from which neither she nor her parents nor her doctors would ever recover. Lia's parents, Foua and Nao Kao, were part of a large Hmong community in Merced, refugees from the CIA-run "Quiet War" in Laos. The Hmong, traditionally a close-knit and fiercely people, have been less amenable to assimilation than most immigrants, adhering steadfastly to the rituals and beliefs of their ancestors. Lia's pediatricians, Neil Ernst and his wife, Peggy Philip, cleaved just as strongly to another tradition: that of Western medicine. When Lia Lee Entered the American medical system, diagnosed as an epileptic, her story became a tragic case history of cultural miscommunication. Parents and doctors both wanted the best for Lia, but their ideas about the causes of her illness and its treatment could hardly have been more different. The Hmong see illness aand healing as spiritual matters linked to virtually everything in the universe, while medical community marks a division between body and soul, and concerns itself almost exclusively with the former. Lia's doctors ascribed her seizures to the misfiring of her cerebral neurons; her parents called her illness, qaug dab peg--the spirit catches you and you fall down--and ascribed it to the wandering of her soul. The doctors prescribed anticonvulsants; her parents preferred animal sacrifices.

Genre : Family & Relationships
Editor : Macmillan
Release : 2012-04-24
ISBN-13 : 9780374533403
Hardcover : 368 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

A study in the collision between Western medicine and the beliefs of a traditional culture focuses on a hospitalized child of Laotian immigrants whose belief that illness is a spiritual matter comes into conflict with doctors' methods.

Genre : Social Science
Editor : Macmillan
Release : 1997-09-30
ISBN-13 : 9780374267810
Hardcover : 341 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Discusses a sick child of Laotian immigrants whose beliefs conflict with Western medicine

The Wine Lover S Daughter by Anne Fadiman

Genre : Biography & Autobiography
Editor : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release : 2017-11-07
ISBN-13 : 9780374711764
Hardcover : 272 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

In The Wine Lover’s Daughter, Anne Fadiman examines—with all her characteristic wit and feeling—her relationship with her father, Clifton Fadiman, a renowned literary critic, editor, and radio host whose greatest love was wine. An appreciation of wine—along with a plummy upper-crust accent, expensive suits, and an encyclopedic knowledge of Western literature—was an essential element of Clifton Fadiman’s escape from lower-middle-class Brooklyn to swanky Manhattan. But wine was not just a class-vaulting accessory; it was an object of ardent desire. The Wine Lover’s Daughter traces the arc of a man’s infatuation from the glass of cheap Graves he drank in Paris in 1927; through the Château Lafite-Rothschild 1904 he drank to celebrate his eightieth birthday, when he and the bottle were exactly the same age; to the wines that sustained him in his last years, when he was blind but still buoyed, as always, by hedonism. Wine is the spine of this touching memoir; the life and character of Fadiman’s father, along with her relationship with him and her own less ardent relationship with wine, are the flesh. The Wine Lover’s Daughter is a poignant exploration of love, ambition, class, family, and the pleasures of the palate by one of our finest essayists.

Rereadings by Anne Fadiman

Genre : Literary Criticism
Editor : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release : 2006-09-05
ISBN-13 : 9781429930864
Hardcover : 272 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Is a book the same book-or a reader the same reader-the second time around? The seventeen authors in this witty and poignant collection of essays all agree on the answer: Never. The editor of Rereadings is Anne Fadiman, and readers of her bestselling book Ex Libris (FSG, 1998) will find this volume especially satisfying. Her chosen authors include Sven Birkerts, Allegra Goodman, Vivian Gornick, Patricia Hampl, Phillip Lopate, and Luc Sante; the objects of their literary affections range from Pride and Prejudice to Sue Barton, Student Nurse. Each has selected a book or a story or a poem--or even, in one case, the lyrics on the back of the Sgt. Pepper album--that made a deep impression in his or her youth, and reread it to see how it has changed in the interim. (Of course, what has really changed is the reader.) These essays are not conventional literary criticism; they are about relationships. The relationship between reader and book is a powerful one, and as these writers attest, it evolves over time. Rereadings reveals at least as much about the reader as about the book: each is a miniature memoir that focuses on that most interesting of topics, the protean nature of love. And as every bibliophile knows, no love is more life-changing than the love of a book.

At Large And At Small by Anne Fadiman

Genre : Biography & Autobiography
Editor : Penguin UK
Release : 2008-11-06
ISBN-13 : 9780141903699
Hardcover : 240 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Butterflies, ice-cream, writing at night, playing word games...in this witty, intimate and delicious book Anne Fadiman ruminates on her passions, both literary and everyday. From mourning the demise of letter-writing to revealing a monumental crush on Charles Lamb, from Balzac's coffee addiction to making ice-cream from Liquid Nitrogen, she draws us into a world of hedonistic pleasures and literary delights. This is the perfect book for life's ardent obsessives.

Ex Libris by Anne Fadiman

Genre : Literary Criticism
Editor : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release : 2011-04-01
ISBN-13 : 9781429929424
Hardcover : 162 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Anne Fadiman is--by her own admission--the sort of person who learned about sex from her father's copy of Fanny Hill, whose husband buys her 19 pounds of dusty books for her birthday, and who once found herself poring over her roommate's 1974 Toyota Corolla manual because it was the only written material in the apartment that she had not read at least twice. This witty collection of essays recounts a lifelong love affair with books and language. For Fadiman, as for many passionate readers, the books she loves have become chapters in her own life story. Writing with remarkable grace, she revives the tradition of the well-crafted personal essay, moving easily from anecdotes about Coleridge and Orwell to tales of her own pathologically literary family. As someone who played at blocks with her father's 22-volume set of Trollope ("My Ancestral Castles") and who only really considered herself married when she and her husband had merged collections ("Marrying Libraries"), she is exquisitely well equipped to expand upon the art of inscriptions, the perverse pleasures of compulsive proof-reading, the allure of long words, and the satisfactions of reading out loud. There is even a foray into pure literary gluttony--Charles Lamb liked buttered muffin crumbs between the leaves, and Fadiman knows of more than one reader who literally consumes page corners. Perfectly balanced between humor and erudition, Ex Libris establishes Fadiman as one of our finest contemporary essayists.

Indigenous Writes by Chelsea Vowel

Genre : Social Science
Editor : Portage & Main Press
Release : 2017-01-10
ISBN-13 : 9781553796893
Hardcover : 240 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Delgamuukw. Sixties Scoop. Bill C-31. Blood quantum. Appropriation. Two-Spirit. Tsilhqot’in. Status. TRC. RCAP. FNPOA. Pass and permit. Numbered Treaties. Terra nullius. The Great Peace… Are you familiar with the terms listed above? In Indigenous Writes, Chelsea Vowel, writer, lawyer, and intellectual, opens an important dialogue about these (and more) concepts and the wider social beliefs associated with the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canada. In 31 essays, Chelsea explores the Indigenous experience from the time of contact to the present, through five categories – Terminology of Relationships; Culture and Identity; Myth-Busting; State Violence; and Land, Learning, Law, and Treaties. She answers the questions that many people have on these topics to spark further conversations at home, in the classroom, and in the larger community.

Genre : Study Aids
Editor : Hyperink Inc
Release : 2012-03-02
ISBN-13 : 9781614641124
Hardcover : 26 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Quicklets: Your Reading Sidekick! This Hyperink Quicklet includes an overall summary, chapter commentary, key characters, literary themes, fun trivia, and recommended related readings. ABOUT THE BOOK Anne Fadiman’s seminal work of nonfiction, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, examines the myriad difficulties and complications that arise when two radically different cultures come in to contact with one another. However, the author contextualizes these larger clashes within a much more intimate, and ultimately human, story: that of the travails of a Hmong family, the Lees, who came to the United States in the 1970’s from Laos as political refugees, and settled in Merced, California. The Hmong are an ethnic group that inhabited the mountainous and densely forested highlands of Southeast Asia. They originally hailed from the southern mainland of China as one of the sub-populations of the Miao ethnicity, but were were relentlessly subjugated and brutalized by the Han peoples, who have long been the dominant ethnic group in the area. This eventually drove them far south to the highlands of China, Vietnam, Laos and Thailand, where the borders between these countries are practically non-existent. MEET THE AUTHOR Marcin Ossowski is a native of Merced, California, a town located at the foot of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and home to the newest University of California campus. He finished his undergraduate work at UCLA in 2007 and majored in linguistics and neuroscience, respectively. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK In accordance with Hmong tradition, Lia’s name was given to her three days after her birth, in a ceremony called hu plig, translated as “soul-calling.” Perhaps more accurately, this is described as the tradition whereby the soul is installed in the newborn child. The Hmong believed that the most common cause of illness was the loss of the soul since humans are bound to yaaj-yang, the earthly realm, and can not travel freely to yeeb-yin, the spiritual realm. However, the body is deeply bound to the soul, and both are equally bound to life; this bond of all three was necessary for health and happiness. However, the soul could be, in turn, flighty, skittish or even easily stolen; those who possessed the ability to maintain their unity with the soul were deeply blessed. Furthermore, the souls of babies were especially prone to disappearance or kidnapping. This was always done at the hands of malevolent spirits known as dab, and the guarding of one’s spirit and its crucial bond with soul and body was a profound fixture in the Hmong cultural identity... Buy a copy to keep reading!

A Heart For The Work by Claire L. Wendland

Genre : Medical
Editor : University of Chicago Press
Release : 2010-10-01
ISBN-13 : 9780226893273
Hardcover : 330 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Burnout is common among doctors in the West, so one might assume that a medical career in Malawi, one of the poorest countries in the world, would place far greater strain on the idealism that drives many doctors. But, as A Heart for the Work makes clear, Malawian medical students learn to confront poverty creatively, experiencing fatigue and frustration but also joy and commitment on their way to becoming physicians. The first ethnography of medical training in the global South, Claire L. Wendland’s book is a moving and perceptive look at medicine in a world where the transnational movement of people and ideas creates both devastation and possibility. Wendland, a physician anthropologist, conducted extensive interviews and worked in wards, clinics, and operating theaters alongside the student doctors whose stories she relates. From the relative calm of Malawi’s College of Medicine to the turbulence of training at hospitals with gravely ill patients and dramatically inadequate supplies, staff, and technology, Wendland’s work reveals the way these young doctors engage the contradictions of their circumstances, shedding new light on debates about the effects of medical training, the impact of traditional healing, and the purposes of medicine.