The Black Campus Movement

The Black Campus Movement
Available:
Author: I. Rogers
Pages: 235
ISBN: 9781137016508
Release: 2012-03-12
Editor: Springer

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

This book provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. It also illuminates the context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

The Black Campus Movement

The Black Campus Movement
Available:
Author: I. Rogers
Pages: 235
ISBN: 0230117805
Release: 2012-04-03
Editor: Palgrave Macmillan

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

This book provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. It also illuminates the context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

The Black Revolution on Campus

The Black Revolution on Campus
Available:
Author: Martha Biondi
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780520282186
Release: 2014-03-21
Editor: Univ of California Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Winner of the Wesley-Logan Prize in African Diaspora History from the American Historical Association and the Benjamin Hooks National Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work on the American Civil Rights Movement and Its Legacy.

The Black Campus Movement

The Black Campus Movement
Available:
Author: Ibram Henry Rogers
Pages: 838
ISBN: OCLC:660081055
Release: 2009
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Black Power on Campus

Black Power on Campus
Available:
Author: Joy Ann WIlliamson
Pages: 216
ISBN: 9780252095801
Release: 2003-06-17
Editor: University of Illinois Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Joy Ann Williamson charts the evolution of black consciousness on predominately white American campuses during the critical period between the mid-1960s and mid-1970s, with the Black student movement at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign serving as an illuminating microcosm of similar movements across the country. Drawing on student publications of the late 1960s and early 1970s, as well as interviews with student activists, former administrators, and faculty, Williamson discusses the emergence of Black Power ideology, what constituted "blackness," and notions of self-advancement versus racial solidarity.

Campus Uprisings

Campus Uprisings
Available:
Author: Ty-Ron M. O. Douglas,Ivory Toldson,Kmt G. Shockley,James A. Banks
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9780807763667
Release: 2020
Editor: Multicultural Education

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"CAMPUS UPRISINGS captures the voices and spirit of student activists, faculty, administration, and staff as they protest the racial and social injustices that occurred in communities like Ferguson, Missouri and elsewhere, and to demonstrate the power and value of principled non-violent activism to provoke change"--

Undermining Racial Justice

Undermining Racial Justice
Available:
Author: Matthew Johnson
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9781501748592
Release: 2020-04-15
Editor: Cornell University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Over the last sixty years, administrators on college campuses nationwide have responded to black campus activists by making racial inclusion and inequality compatible. This bold argument is at the center of Matthew Johnson's powerful and controversial book. Focusing on the University of Michigan, often a key talking point in national debates about racial justice thanks to the contentious Gratz v. Bollinger 2003 Supreme Court case, Johnson argues that UM leaders incorporated black student dissent selectively into the institution's policies, practices, and values. This strategy was used to prevent activism from disrupting the institutional priorities that campus leaders deemed more important than racial justice. Despite knowing that racial disparities would likely continue, Johnson demonstrates that these administrators improbably saw themselves as champions of racial equity. What Johnson contends in Undermining Racial Justice is not that good intentions resulted in unforeseen negative consequences, but that the people who created and maintained racial inequities at premier institutions of higher education across the United States firmly believed they had good intentions in spite of all the evidence to the contrary. The case of the University of Michigan fits into a broader pattern at elite colleges and universities and is a cautionary tale for all in higher education. As Johnson illustrates, inclusion has always been a secondary priority, and, as a result, the policies of the late 1970s and 1980s ushered in a new and enduring era of racial retrenchment on campuses nationwide.

How to Be an Antiracist

How to Be an Antiracist
Available:
Author: Ibram X. Kendi
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780525509288
Release: 2019
Editor: One World/Ballantine

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

From the National Book Award-winning author of Stamped from the Beginning comes a bracingly original approach to understanding and uprooting racism and inequality in our society--and in ourselves. "The only way to undo racism is to consistently identify and describe it--and then dismantle it." Ibram X. Kendi's concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in America--but even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it. In this book, Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science, bringing it all together with an engaging personal narrative of his own awakening to antiracism. How to Be an Antiracist is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond an awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a truly just and equitable society. Advance praise for How to Be an Antiracist "This latest from the National Book Award-winning author is no guidebook to getting woke. . . . Rather, it is a combination of memoir and extension of . . . Kendi's towering Stamped From the Beginning that leads readers through a taxonomy of racist thought to anti-racist action. . . . Never wavering . . . Kendi methodically examines racism through numerous lenses: power, biology, ethnicity, body, culture, and so forth. . . . If Kendi is justifiably hard on America, he's just as hard on himself. . . . This unsparing honesty helps readers, both white and people of color, navigate this difficult intellectual territory. Not an easy read but an essential one."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "Ibram Kendi is today's visionary in the enduring struggle for racial justice. In this personal and revelatory new work, he yet again holds up a transformative lens, challenging both mainstream and antiracist orthodoxy. He illuminates the foundations of racism in revolutionary new ways, and I am consistently challenged and inspired by his analysis. How to Be an Antiracist offers us a necessary and critical way forward."--Robin DiAngelo, New York Times bestselling author of White Fragility

Higher Education and the Civil Rights Movement

Higher Education and the Civil Rights Movement
Available:
Author: Peter Wallenstein
Pages: 298
ISBN: UOM:39076002890940
Release: 2009
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"The first comprehensive study of the process of desegregation as it unfolded during the twentieth century at the flagship universities and white land-grant institutions of the south."--Amy Thompson McCandless, College of Charleston "Broadens the discussion of the civil rights movement to include academic spaces as sites of struggle and contributes to southern history by providing unique accounts of black agency during the dismantling of the Jim Crow South."-- Stephanie Y. Evans, University of Florida Nowhere else can one read about how Brown v. Board of Education transformed higher education on campus after campus, in state after state, across the South. And no other book details the continuing struggle to change each school in the years that followed the enrollment of the first African American students. Institutions of higher education long functioned as bastions of white supremacy and black exclusion. Against the walls of Jim Crow and the powers of state laws, black southerners--prospective students, their parents and families, their lawyers and their communities--struggled to gain access and equity. Higher Education and the Civil Rights Movement examines an understudied aspect of racial history, revealing desegregation to be a process, not an event.

The Campus Color Line

The Campus Color Line
Available:
Author: Eddie R. Cole
Pages: 376
ISBN: 9780691206752
Release: 2020-09-29
Editor: Princeton University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"A stunning and ambitious origins story."—Ibram X. Kendi, National Book Award–winning and #1 New York Times–bestselling author The remarkable history of how college presidents shaped the struggle for racial equality Some of America’s most pressing civil rights issues—desegregation, equal educational and employment opportunities, housing discrimination, and free speech—have been closely intertwined with higher education institutions. Although it is commonly known that college students and other activists, as well as politicians, actively participated in the fight for and against civil rights in the middle decades of the twentieth century, historical accounts have not adequately focused on the roles that the nation’s college presidents played in the debates concerning racism. Based on archival research conducted at a range of colleges and universities across the United States, The Campus Color Line sheds light on the important place of college presidents in the struggle for racial parity. Focusing on the period between 1948 and 1968, Eddie Cole shows how college presidents, during a time of violence and unrest, strategically, yet often silently, initiated and shaped racial policies and practices inside and outside of the educational sphere. With courage and hope, as well as malice and cruelty, college presidents positioned themselves—sometimes precariously—amid conflicting interests and demands. Black college presidents challenged racist policies as their students demonstrated in the streets against segregation, while presidents of major universities lobbied for urban renewal programs that displaced Black communities near campus. Some presidents amended campus speech practices to accommodate white supremacist speakers, even as other academic leaders developed the nation’s first affirmative action programs in higher education. The Campus Color Line illuminates how the legacy of academic leaders’ actions continues to influence the unfinished struggle for Black freedom and racial equity in education and beyond.

Stamped from the Beginning

Stamped from the Beginning
Available:
Author: Ibram X. Kendi
Pages: 592
ISBN: 9781568584645
Release: 2016-04-12
Editor: Bold Type Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society. Some Americans insist that we're living in a post-racial society. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America -- it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis. As Kendi shows, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. They were created to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial inequities. In shedding light on this history, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose racist thinking. In the process, he gives us reason to hope.

Rebellion in Black and White

Rebellion in Black and White
Available:
Author: Robert Cohen,David J. Snyder
Pages: 337
ISBN: 9781421408507
Release: 2013-05
Editor: JHU Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

SynnottJeffrey A. TurnerErica WhittingtonJoy Ann Williamson-Lott

Campus Wars

Campus Wars
Available:
Author: Kenneth J. Heineman
Pages: 366
ISBN: 9780814735121
Release: 1994-05-01
Editor: NYU Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In many parts of the African Muslim world, slavery still blights the landscape. What are the origins of this terrible institution? Why is it still practiced? How widespread is it and how does it differ from Western chattel slavery? This book tells the story of how the enslavement of Africans by Berbers, Arabs, and other Africans became institutionalized and legitimized throughout Muslim Africa. A classic, pioneering study, first published in 1971 and extensively updated in this revised edition, Slavery in the History of Black Muslim Africa provides an expansive portrait of domestic slavery from the tenth to the nineteenth century in the context of the religious, social, and economic conditions of the African Islamic world. Drawing on a host of accounts from contemporary observers such as Leo Africanus and Ibn Battuta, Fisher and Fisher describe the status and rights of slaves in Africa, and their various roles as currency, goods, eunuchs, soldiers, and statesmen, as well as the jarring historical interruption brought on by slave raiders and traders in West and North Africa.

The New Campus Anti Rape Movement

The New Campus Anti Rape Movement
Available:
Author: Caroline Heldman,Alissa R. Ackerman,Ian Breckenridge-Jackson
Pages: 230
ISBN: 9781498554022
Release: 2018-05-29
Editor: Lexington Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

This is the first book to examine the new campus anti-rape movement that emerged in 2014. The authors examine the role of new laws and social media in facilitating movement successes.

Black Power beyond Borders

Black Power beyond Borders
Available:
Author: N. Slate
Pages: 214
ISBN: 9781137295064
Release: 2012-11-28
Editor: Springer

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

This groundbreaking volume examines the transnational dimensions of Black Power - how Black Power thinkers and activists drew on foreign movements and vice versa how individuals and groups in other parts of the world interpreted 'Black Power,' from African liberation movements to anti-caste agitation in India to indigenous protests in New Zealand.

From Black Power to Black Studies

From Black Power to Black Studies
Available:
Author: Fabio Rojas
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780801899713
Release: 2010-09-01
Editor: JHU Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The black power movement helped redefine African Americans' identity and establish a new racial consciousness in the 1960s. As an influential political force, this movement in turn spawned the academic discipline known as Black Studies. Today there are more than a hundred Black Studies degree programs in the United States, many of them located in America’s elite research institutions. In From Black Power to Black Studies, Fabio Rojas explores how this radical social movement evolved into a recognized academic discipline. Rojas traces the evolution of Black Studies over more than three decades, beginning with its origins in black nationalist politics. His account includes the 1968 Third World Strike at San Francisco State College, the Ford Foundation’s attempts to shape the field, and a description of Black Studies programs at various American universities. His statistical analyses of protest data illuminate how violent and nonviolent protests influenced the establishment of Black Studies programs. Integrating personal interviews and newly discovered archival material, Rojas documents how social activism can bring about organizational change. Shedding light on the black power movement, Black Studies programs, and American higher education, this historical analysis reveals how radical politics are assimilated into the university system.

Changing Academia Forever

Changing Academia Forever
Available:
Author: Kitty Kelly Epstein,Bernard Stringer
Pages: 165
ISBN: 9781975502744
Release: 2020-01-31
Editor: Stylus Publishing, LLC

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The most effective and long-lasting student strike in U.S. History took place at San Francisco State College in 1968. The first Black Student Union, the first Black Studies Department, the only College of Ethnic Studies, and the admission of thousands of students of color resulted from this four-and-a-half-month strike which shut down 80% of the campus. It has been called the movement which “changed academia forever.” Black students were only a small percentage of those on campus, but they managed to engage thousands of white, Latino, Asian, and indigenous students; SDS and the Third World Liberation Front; the faculty union; and a huge portion of the San Francisco Community. In the end, they were able to win most of their 15 demands. The book is written by two participants in the strike, one a member of the BSU leadership. Oral histories of strike leaders are integrated with discussion of the events and significance of this movement. What were the politics and strategies? Why was the strike successful and what are the insights for today’s mass movements? Perfect for courses such as: Introduction to Black Studies | Introduction to Ethnic Studies | Recent U.S. History | Protest Movements | Higher Education | Urban Education | Multicultural Education | History of Education | Philosophy of Education | Oral History | Qualitative Methods | African-American History | African-American Education | African-American Politics

Harlem vs Columbia University

Harlem vs  Columbia University
Available:
Author: Stefan M. Bradley
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780252090585
Release: 2010-10-01
Editor: University of Illinois Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In 1968-69, Columbia University became the site for a collision of American social movements. Black Power, student power, antiwar, New Left, and Civil Rights movements all clashed with local and state politics when an alliance of black students and residents of Harlem and Morningside Heights openly protested the school's ill-conceived plan to build a large, private gymnasium in the small green park that separates the elite university from Harlem. Railing against the university's expansion policy, protesters occupied administration buildings and met violent opposition from both fellow students and the police. In this dynamic book, Stefan M. Bradley describes the impact of Black Power ideology on the Students' Afro-American Society (SAS) at Columbia. While white students--led by Mark Rudd and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)--sought to radicalize the student body and restructure the university, black students focused on stopping the construction of the gym in Morningside Park. Through separate, militant action, black students and the black community stood up to the power of an Ivy League institution and stopped it from trampling over its relatively poor and powerless neighbors. Bradley also compares the events at Columbia with similar events at Harvard, Cornell, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Upending the Ivory Tower

Upending the Ivory Tower
Available:
Author: Stefan M. Bradley
Pages: 480
ISBN: 9781479819270
Release: 2018-09-25
Editor: NYU Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Winner, 2019 Anna Julia Cooper and C.L.R. James Award, given by the National Council for Black Studies The inspiring story of the black students, faculty, and administrators who forever changed America’s leading educational institutions and paved the way for social justice and racial progress The eight elite institutions that comprise the Ivy League, sometimes known as the Ancient Eight—Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, Dartmouth, and Cornell—are American stalwarts that have profoundly influenced history and culture by producing the nation’s and the world’s leaders. The few black students who attended Ivy League schools in the decades following WWII not only went on to greatly influence black America and the nation in general, but unquestionably awakened these most traditional and selective of American spaces. In the twentieth century, black youth were in the vanguard of the black freedom movement and educational reform. Upending the Ivory Tower illuminates how the Black Power movement, which was borne out of an effort to edify the most disfranchised of the black masses, also took root in the hallowed halls of America’s most esteemed institutions of higher education. Between the close of WWII and 1975, the civil rights and Black Power movements transformed the demographics and operation of the Ivy League on and off campus. As desegregators and racial pioneers, black students, staff, and faculty used their status in the black intelligentsia to enhance their predominantly white institutions while advancing black freedom. Although they were often marginalized because of their race and class, the newcomers altered educational policies and inserted blackness into the curricula and culture of the unabashedly exclusive and starkly white schools. This book attempts to complete the narrative of higher education history, while adding a much needed nuance to the history of the Black Power movement. It tells the stories of those students, professors, staff, and administrators who pushed for change at the risk of losing what privilege they had. Putting their status, and sometimes even their lives, in jeopardy, black activists negotiated, protested, and demonstrated to create opportunities for the generations that followed. The enrichments these change agents made endure in the diversity initiatives and activism surrounding issues of race that exist in the modern Ivy League. Upending the Ivory Tower not only informs the civil rights and Black Power movements of the postwar era but also provides critical context for the Black Lives Matter movement that is growing in the streets and on campuses throughout the country today. As higher education continues to be a catalyst for change, there is no one better to inform today’s activists than those who transformed our country’s past and paved the way for its future.

Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement

Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement
Available:
Author: Barbara Ransby
Pages: 470
ISBN: 9780807827789
Release: 2003
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A stirring new portrait of one of the most important black leaders of the twentieth century introduces readers to the fiery woman who inspired generations of activists. (Social Science)