Genre : Education
Editor : Springer
Release : 2012-03-12
ISBN-13 : 9781137016508
Hardcover : 235 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

This book provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. It also illuminates the context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

Genre : Education
Editor : Palgrave Macmillan
Release : 2012-04-03
ISBN-13 : 0230117805
Hardcover : 235 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

This book provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. It also illuminates the context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

Genre : Education
Editor : Univ of California Press
Release : 2014-03-21
ISBN-13 : 9780520282186
Hardcover : 368 Pages


Available: macOS, Windows, Android, Tablet

Winner of the Wesley-Logan Prize in African Diaspora History from the American Historical Association and the Benjamin Hooks National Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work on the American Civil Rights Movement and Its Legacy.

Campus Uprisings by Ty-Ron M.O. Douglas

Genre : Education
Editor : Teachers College Press
Release :
ISBN-13 : 9780807778456
Hardcover : Pages


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The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that “White supremacist groups are targeting college campuses like never before,” while the appearance of nooses, swastikas, and racial epithets are increasing across the United States. This timely volume presents a wide-range of perspectives to offer readers practical steps and policy options for creating campus structures that are fair and inclusive to students of all races and social statuses. It features chapters from a university president, department chair, a campus chaplain, cultural center directors, faculty, and students—including voices from the University of Missouri and Howard University during their recent series of protests. Campus Uprisings demonstrates the power and value of principled non-violent activism to provoke change and provides thoughtful strategies to help universities manage conflict and racial tension. Book Features: Recommendations drawn from both scholarly analyses focused on practice and reflections from actual practitioners.“Voices from the Field” presents real-time perspectives of activists who are currently working toward societal change. An intergenerational relevance with chapters on the Civil Rights era protests and current movements, such as Me Too and Black Lives Matter. Contributors: James Alford, Noelle Witherspoon Arnold, Lisa Bass, Barbara Boakye, Mahauganee Shaw Bonds, Travis D. Boyce, Winsome M. Chunnu, Lucy Douglas, Ty-Ron M.O. Douglas, Brittany Fatoma, Sydney Freeman Jr., Shaun R. Harper, Brian Heilmeier, Dena Lane-Bonds, Kofi LeNiles, Jonathan A. McElderry, Kelsey Morris, Ransford Pinto, Stephanie Hernandez Rivera, Kmt G. Shockley, Stephanie Shonekan, Ivory A. Toldson, Evan Willis, and Christine Woods

Black Power On Campus by Joy Ann WIlliamson

Genre : Social Science
Editor : University of Illinois Press
Release : 2003-06-17
ISBN-13 : 9780252095801
Hardcover : 216 Pages


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Joy Ann Williamson charts the evolution of black consciousness on predominately white American campuses during the critical period between the mid-1960s and mid-1970s, with the Black student movement at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign serving as an illuminating microcosm of similar movements across the country. Drawing on student publications of the late 1960s and early 1970s, as well as interviews with student activists, former administrators, and faculty, Williamson discusses the emergence of Black Power ideology, what constituted "blackness," and notions of self-advancement versus racial solidarity.

Genre : Education
Editor : JHU Press
Release : 2013-05-01
ISBN-13 : 9781421408514
Hardcover : 368 Pages


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Rebellion in Black and White offers a panoramic view of southern student activism in the 1960s. Original scholarly essays demonstrate how southern students promoted desegregation, racial equality, free speech, academic freedom, world peace, gender equity, sexual liberation, Black Power, and the personal freedoms associated with the counterculture of the decade. Most accounts of the 1960s student movement and the New Left have been northern-centered, focusing on rebellions at the University of California, Berkeley, Columbia University, and others. And yet, students at southern colleges and universities also organized and acted to change race and gender relations and to end the Vietnam War. Southern students took longer to rebel due to the south’s legacy of segregation, its military tradition, and its Bible Belt convictions, but their efforts were just as effective as those in the north. Rebellion in Black and White sheds light on higher education, students, culture, and politics of the American south. Edited by Robert Cohen and David J. Snyder, the book features the work of both seasoned historians and a new generation of scholars offering fresh perspectives on the civil rights movement and many others. Contributors: Dan T. Carter David T. Farber Jelani Favors Wesley Hogan Christopher A. Huff Nicholas G. Meriwether Gregg L. Michel Kelly Morrow Doug Rossinow Cleveland L. Sellers Jr. Gary S. Sprayberry Marcia G. Synnott Jeffrey A. Turner Erica Whittington Joy Ann Williamson-Lott

Harlem Vs Columbia University by Stefan M. Bradley

Genre : Social Science
Editor : University of Illinois Press
Release : 2010-10-01
ISBN-13 : 9780252090585
Hardcover : 272 Pages


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In 1968-69, Columbia University became the site for a collision of American social movements. Black Power, student power, antiwar, New Left, and Civil Rights movements all clashed with local and state politics when an alliance of black students and residents of Harlem and Morningside Heights openly protested the school's ill-conceived plan to build a large, private gymnasium in the small green park that separates the elite university from Harlem. Railing against the university's expansion policy, protesters occupied administration buildings and met violent opposition from both fellow students and the police. In this dynamic book, Stefan M. Bradley describes the impact of Black Power ideology on the Students' Afro-American Society (SAS) at Columbia. While white students--led by Mark Rudd and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)--sought to radicalize the student body and restructure the university, black students focused on stopping the construction of the gym in Morningside Park. Through separate, militant action, black students and the black community stood up to the power of an Ivy League institution and stopped it from trampling over its relatively poor and powerless neighbors. Bradley also compares the events at Columbia with similar events at Harvard, Cornell, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Undermining Racial Justice by Matthew Johnson

Genre : History
Editor : Cornell University Press
Release : 2020-04-15
ISBN-13 : 9781501748592
Hardcover : 336 Pages


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Over the last sixty years, administrators on college campuses nationwide have responded to black campus activists by making racial inclusion and inequality compatible. This bold argument is at the center of Matthew Johnson's powerful and controversial book. Focusing on the University of Michigan, often a key talking point in national debates about racial justice thanks to the contentious Gratz v. Bollinger 2003 Supreme Court case, Johnson argues that UM leaders incorporated black student dissent selectively into the institution's policies, practices, and values. This strategy was used to prevent activism from disrupting the institutional priorities that campus leaders deemed more important than racial justice. Despite knowing that racial disparities would likely continue, Johnson demonstrates that these administrators improbably saw themselves as champions of racial equity. What Johnson contends in Undermining Racial Justice is not that good intentions resulted in unforeseen negative consequences, but that the people who created and maintained racial inequities at premier institutions of higher education across the United States firmly believed they had good intentions in spite of all the evidence to the contrary. The case of the University of Michigan fits into a broader pattern at elite colleges and universities and is a cautionary tale for all in higher education. As Johnson illustrates, inclusion has always been a secondary priority, and, as a result, the policies of the late 1970s and 1980s ushered in a new and enduring era of racial retrenchment on campuses nationwide.

White Money Black Power by Noliwe M. Rooks

Genre : Education
Editor : Beacon Press
Release : 2006
ISBN-13 : 0807032719
Hardcover : 213 Pages


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The history of African American Studies is often told as a heroic tale, with compelling images of black power and passionate African American students who refuse to take "no" for an answer. Noliwe M. Rooks argues for the recognition of another story that proves that many of the programs that survived were actually begun due to heavy funding from the Ford Foundation or, put another way, as a result of white philanthropy. Today, many students in African American Studies courses are white, and an increasing number of black students come from Africa or the Caribbean, not the United States. This shift--which makes the survival of the discipline contingent on non-African American students--means that "blackness can mean everything and, at the same time, nothing at all." While the Ford Foundation provided much-needed funding, its strategies, aimed at addressing America"s "race problem," have left African American Studies struggling to define its identity in light of the changes it faces today. With unflinching honesty, Rooks shows that the only way to create a stable future for African American Studies is through confronting its complex past.

Upending The Ivory Tower by Stefan M. Bradley

Genre : History
Editor : NYU Press
Release : 2018-09-25
ISBN-13 : 9781479819270
Hardcover : 480 Pages


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Winner, 2019 Anna Julia Cooper and C.L.R. James Award, given by the National Council for Black Studies The inspiring story of the black students, faculty, and administrators who forever changed America’s leading educational institutions and paved the way for social justice and racial progress The eight elite institutions that comprise the Ivy League, sometimes known as the Ancient Eight—Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, Dartmouth, and Cornell—are American stalwarts that have profoundly influenced history and culture by producing the nation’s and the world’s leaders. The few black students who attended Ivy League schools in the decades following WWII not only went on to greatly influence black America and the nation in general, but unquestionably awakened these most traditional and selective of American spaces. In the twentieth century, black youth were in the vanguard of the black freedom movement and educational reform. Upending the Ivory Tower illuminates how the Black Power movement, which was borne out of an effort to edify the most disfranchised of the black masses, also took root in the hallowed halls of America’s most esteemed institutions of higher education. Between the close of WWII and 1975, the civil rights and Black Power movements transformed the demographics and operation of the Ivy League on and off campus. As desegregators and racial pioneers, black students, staff, and faculty used their status in the black intelligentsia to enhance their predominantly white institutions while advancing black freedom. Although they were often marginalized because of their race and class, the newcomers altered educational policies and inserted blackness into the curricula and culture of the unabashedly exclusive and starkly white schools. This book attempts to complete the narrative of higher education history, while adding a much needed nuance to the history of the Black Power movement. It tells the stories of those students, professors, staff, and administrators who pushed for change at the risk of losing what privilege they had. Putting their status, and sometimes even their lives, in jeopardy, black activists negotiated, protested, and demonstrated to create opportunities for the generations that followed. The enrichments these change agents made endure in the diversity initiatives and activism surrounding issues of race that exist in the modern Ivy League. Upending the Ivory Tower not only informs the civil rights and Black Power movements of the postwar era but also provides critical context for the Black Lives Matter movement that is growing in the streets and on campuses throughout the country today. As higher education continues to be a catalyst for change, there is no one better to inform today’s activists than those who transformed our country’s past and paved the way for its future.