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Author:
Genre: Science
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781444144710
Book Pages: 224
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

'Human Geography' examines the major trends, debates, research and conceptual evolution of human geography during the twentieth century. Considering each of the subject's primary subfields in turn, it addresses developments in both continental European and Anglo-American geography, providing a cutting-edge evaluation of each. Written clearly and accessibly by leading researchers, the book combines historical astuteness with personal insights and draws on a range of theoretical positions. A central theme of the book is the relative decline of the traditional subdisciplines towards the end of the twentieth century, and the continuing movement towards interdisciplinarity in which the various strands of human geography are seen as inextricably linked. This stimulating and exciting new book provides a unique insight into the study of geography during the twentieth century, and is essential reading for anyone studying the history and philosophy of the subject.


Author: Anna Davies
Genre: Science
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781444144611
Book Pages: 384
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

Researching Human Geography is an essential new text for any geography student about to embark on a research project. An understanding of how different theories of knowledge have influenced research methodologies is crucial in planning and designing effective research; this book makes this link clear and explores how various philosophical positions, from positivism to post-structuralism, have become associated with particular methodologies. The book gives an overview of a wide range of methods and data collection, both quantitative and qualitative, and explores their strengths and weaknesses for different kinds of research. 'Researching Human Geography' also looks at the various techniques available for the analysis of data, which is presented as an integral and ongoing part of the research process. Clearly written, with extensive use of examples from previous research to show 'methodology in action', this new text is an invaluable addition to both the theory and method of research in human geography.


Author: Robin Flowerdew
Genre: Social Science
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317873389
Book Pages: 392
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


Author: Jim Lindsay
Genre: Science
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134733149
Book Pages: 224
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

The first concise guide to the purposeful use of techniques in human geography. Examining key techniques in detail - survey and qualitative, numerical, spatial and computer-based - the book draws on important case studies, such as the decennial census, to illustrate applications. The importance of up-to-date IT based techniques is particularly stressed, introducing widely recognised applications. A final section explores the Internet, which offers exciting new resources but also creates problems for researchers used to traditional academic fields.


Author: Audrey Kobayashi
Genre: Social Science
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317907039
Book Pages: 280
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

This book highlights the increasingly important contribution of geographical theory to the understanding of social change, values, economic & political organization and ethical imperatives. As a cohesive collection of chapters from well-known geographers in Britain and North America, it reflects the aims of the contributors in striving to bridge the gap between the historical-materialist and humanist interpretations of human geography. The book deals with both the contemporary issues outlined above and the situation in which they emerge: industrial restructuring, planning, women’s issues, social and cultural practices and the landscape as context for social action.


Author: Andrew Jones
Genre: Social Science
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780415575515
Book Pages: 209
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

Human Geography: The Basics is a concise introduction to the study of the role that humankind plays in shaping the world around us. Whether ite(tm)s environmental concerns, the cities we live in or the globalization of the economy, these are issues which affect us all. This book introduces these topics and more including: global environment issues and development cities, firms and regions migration, immigration and asylum landscape, culture and identity travel, mobility and tourism agriculture and food. Featuring an overview of theory, end of chapter summaries, case study boxes, further reading lists and a glossary, this book is the ideal introduction for anybody new to the study of human geography.


Author: Kevin R. Cox
Genre: Social Science
Publisher: Guilford Publications
ISBN: 9781462512911
Book Pages: 292
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

This book cogently examines how human geography has developed from a field with limited self-awareness regarding method and theory to the vibrant study of society and space that it is today. Kevin R. Cox provides an interpretive, critical perspective on Anglo-American geographic thought in the 20th and 21st centuries. He probes the impact of the spatial-quantitative revolution and geography's engagement with other social sciences, particularly in social theory. Key concepts and theories in the field are explained and illustrated with instructive research examples. Cox explores both how new approaches to human geography get constructed and what each school of thought has contributed to understanding the world in which we live.


Author: Nuala C. Johnson
Genre: Science
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781351160346
Book Pages: 522
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

Human geographers have been at the forefront of research that examines the relationships between space, culture and society. This volume contains twenty-one essays, published over the past thirty years, that are iconic instances of this investigative field. With a focus on four broad themes - landscape, identity, colonialism, nature - these essays represent some of the best and most innovative interventions that geographers have made on these topics. From the visual to the corporeal, from rural Ceylon to urban America and from the sixteenth century to the twenty-first, this volume brings together a set of theoretically sophisticated and empirically grounded works.


Author: Gerald Rudolph Pitzl
Genre: Social Science
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 0313320101
Book Pages: 294
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

The full range of this remarkable field is presented through nearly 300 pertinent models, concepts, theories, and people associated with human geography.


Author: Weronika A. Kusek
Genre: Science
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780429632549
Book Pages: 172
Format: PDF, ePub & Mobi

This book explores an innovative set of critical narratives, accounts and engagements by different authors about their professional mobility and how that relates to the discipline and their life experiences. Human Geography and Professional Mobility seeks to encourage, influence, and help students understand geographic concepts based on critical reflections, international experiences, and practical insight laid out in stories of real people, real geographers, and real college faculty, that students can relate to. This volume is less theoretical and more personal insight-based, wherein first-hand and personal accounts of practical experiences are explored, which renders the text supplementary reading for human geography, population geography, world geography, and migration/mobility classes. With critical navigation of spaces in response to several geographical questions, this book offers a novel perspective on professional mobility of geographers which will be of interest to students and academics in the fields of geography, tourism, sociology, and anthropology.