Ghosts in the Schoolyard

Ghosts in the Schoolyard
Available:
Author: Eve L. Ewing
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780226526164
Release: 2020-02-15
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"Failing schools. Underprivileged schools. Just plain bad schools." That's how Eve L. Ewing opens Ghosts in the Schoolyard: describing Chicago Public Schools from the outside. The way politicians and pundits and parents of kids who attend other schools talk about them, with a mix of pity and contempt. But Ewing knows Chicago Public Schools from the inside: as a student, then a teacher, and now a scholar who studies them. And that perspective has shown her that public schools are not buildings full of failures--they're an integral part of their neighborhoods, at the heart of their communities, storehouses of history and memory that bring people together. Never was that role more apparent than in 2013 when Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced an unprecedented wave of school closings. Pitched simultaneously as a solution to a budget problem, a response to declining enrollments, and a chance to purge bad schools that were dragging down the whole system, the plan was met with a roar of protest from parents, students, and teachers. But if these schools were so bad, why did people care so much about keeping them open, to the point that some would even go on a hunger strike? Ewing's answer begins with a story of systemic racism, inequality, bad faith, and distrust that stretches deep into Chicago history. Rooting her exploration in the historic African American neighborhood of Bronzeville, Ewing reveals that this issue is about much more than just schools. Black communities see the closing of their schools--schools that are certainly less than perfect but that are theirs--as one more in a long line of racist policies. The fight to keep them open is yet another front in the ongoing struggle of black people in America to build successful lives and achieve true self-determination.

Ghosts in the Schoolyard

Ghosts in the Schoolyard
Available:
Author: Eve L. Ewing
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780226526331
Release: 2018-10-05
Editor: University of Chicago Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

“Failing schools. Underprivileged schools. Just plain bad schools.” That’s how Eve L. Ewing opens Ghosts in the Schoolyard: describing Chicago Public Schools from the outside. The way politicians and pundits and parents of kids who attend other schools talk about them, with a mix of pity and contempt. But Ewing knows Chicago Public Schools from the inside: as a student, then a teacher, and now a scholar who studies them. And that perspective has shown her that public schools are not buildings full of failures—they’re an integral part of their neighborhoods, at the heart of their communities, storehouses of history and memory that bring people together. Never was that role more apparent than in 2013 when Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced an unprecedented wave of school closings. Pitched simultaneously as a solution to a budget problem, a response to declining enrollments, and a chance to purge bad schools that were dragging down the whole system, the plan was met with a roar of protest from parents, students, and teachers. But if these schools were so bad, why did people care so much about keeping them open, to the point that some would even go on a hunger strike? Ewing’s answer begins with a story of systemic racism, inequality, bad faith, and distrust that stretches deep into Chicago history. Rooting her exploration in the historic African American neighborhood of Bronzeville, Ewing reveals that this issue is about much more than just schools. Black communities see the closing of their schools—schools that are certainly less than perfect but that are theirs—as one more in a long line of racist policies. The fight to keep them open is yet another front in the ongoing struggle of black people in America to build successful lives and achieve true self-determination.

Ghosts in the Schoolyard

Ghosts in the Schoolyard
Available:
Author: Eve L. Ewing
Pages: 240
ISBN: 022652602X
Release: 2018-10-22
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"Failing schools. Underprivileged schools. Just plain bad schools." That's how Eve L. Ewing opens Ghosts in the Schoolyard: describing Chicago Public Schools from the outside. The way politicians and pundits and parents of kids who attend other schools talk about them, with a mix of pity and contempt. But Ewing knows Chicago Public Schools from the inside: as a student, then a teacher, and now a scholar who studies them. And that perspective has shown her that public schools are not buildings full of failures--they're an integral part of their neighborhoods, at the heart of their communities, storehouses of history and memory that bring people together. Never was that role more apparent than in 2013 when Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced an unprecedented wave of school closings. Pitched simultaneously as a solution to a budget problem, a response to declining enrollments, and a chance to purge bad schools that were dragging down the whole system, the plan was met with a roar of protest from parents, students, and teachers. But if these schools were so bad, why did people care so much about keeping them open, to the point that some would even go on a hunger strike? Ewing's answer begins with a story of systemic racism, inequality, bad faith, and distrust that stretches deep into Chicago history. Rooting her exploration in the historic African American neighborhood of Bronzeville, Ewing reveals that this issue is about much more than just schools. Black communities see the closing of their schools--schools that are certainly less than perfect but that are theirs--as one more in a long line of racist policies. The fight to keep them open is yet another front in the ongoing struggle of black people in America to build successful lives and achieve true self-determination.

Electric Arches

Electric Arches
Available:
Author: Eve Ewing
Pages: 96
ISBN: 9780141992006
Release: 2020-07-30
Editor: Penguin UK

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Blending stark realism with the surreal and fantastic, Eve L. Ewing's narrative takes us from the streets of Chicago to an unspecified future, deftly navigating the boundaries of space, time, and reality. Ewing imagines familiar figures in magical circumstances, and identifies everyday objects - hair moisturizer, a spiral notebook - as precious icons. Her visual art is spare, playful and poignant: a cereal-box decoder ring that allows the wearer to understand what Black girls are saying; a teacher's angry, subversive message scrawled on the chalkboard. Electric Arches invites fresh conversations about race, gender, the city, identity and the joy and pain of growing up.

Race in the Schoolyard

Race in the Schoolyard
Available:
Author: Amanda E. Lewis,Associate Professor of Sociology Amanda E Lewis
Pages: 243
ISBN: 0813532256
Release: 2003
Editor: Rutgers University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Annotation An exploration of how race is explicitly and implicitly handled in school.

1919

1919
Available:
Author: Eve Ewing
Pages: 96
ISBN: 0141991976
Release: 2020-03-05
Editor: Penguin UK

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In 1919, award-winning poet Eve L. Ewing recovers the essentially human stories at the heart of the Chicago Race Riot of 1919- of the people who took part in it, and of the lives that were marked by it. This most intense of the riots of the USA's 'Red Summer' lasted eight days, resulting in thirty-eight deaths and almost 500 injuries; it was a signal and traumatic event which has now shaped the history of the city where it took place for a century. As well as telling the tale of the riot itself and the cruel murder which precipitated it, the poems of 1919 explore its aftermath and bring to vivid life the mass migrations which had set the stage for this violence in the preceding years. Poetically recounting the stories of everyday people trying to survive and thrive in the city, and using speculative and Afrofuturist lenses to reimagine history, the result is a book which unearths the universal at the heart of the particular, and illuminates the fine line between past and present.

An American Summer

An American Summer
Available:
Author: Alex Kotlowitz
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780804170918
Release: 2020-03-31
Editor: Anchor

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

2020 J. ANTHONY LUKAS PRIZE WINNER From the bestselling author of There Are No Children Here, a richly textured, heartrending portrait of love and death in Chicago's most turbulent neighborhoods. The numbers are staggering: over the past twenty years in Chicago, 14,033 people have been killed and another roughly 60,000 wounded by gunfire. What does that do to the spirit of individuals and community? Drawing on his decades of experience, Alex Kotlowitz set out to chronicle one summer in the city, writing about individuals who have emerged from the violence and whose stories capture the capacity--and the breaking point--of the human heart and soul. The result is a spellbinding collection of deeply intimate profiles that upend what we think we know about gun violence in America. Among others, we meet a man who as a teenager killed a rival gang member and twenty years later is still trying to come to terms with what he's done; a devoted school social worker struggling with her favorite student, who refuses to give evidence in the shooting death of his best friend; the witness to a wrongful police shooting who can't shake what he has seen; and an aging former gang leader who builds a place of refuge for himself and his friends. Applying the close-up, empathic reporting that made There Are No Children Here a modern classic, Kotlowitz offers a piercingly honest portrait of a city in turmoil. These sketches of those left standing will get into your bones. This one summer will stay with you.

Schooling and Work in the Democratic State

Schooling and Work in the Democratic State
Available:
Author: Martin Carnoy,Henry Levin
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780804770422
Release: 1985-06-01
Editor: Stanford University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A new explanation of the relation between schooling and work in the democratic, advanced industrial state emerges from this study that rejects both traditional views and the more recent Marxian perspective. Traditional views consider schools as autonomous institutions that are able to pursue the goals of equality and social mobility irrespective of the inequalities of capitalist society; the Marxian perspective views schools as serving the role of producing wage-labor for capitalistic exploitation. The authors suggest that the shortcomings of both views are rooted in the fact that they do not recognize the true functions of the democratic, capitalist state. The state is seen as an arena for struggle between forces pushing for egalitarian, democratic reforms and those seeking to use the resources of the state for private capital accumulation. Depending on which side has primacy at the moment, schools will reflect one set of goals over the other. However, victory is never complete, and the tide of battle has shifted back and forth historically. The authors develop this theory through interpreting the dynamic relation between U.S. schools and the workplace. Based on this approach, they predict changes in both schooling and work as well as the forms that future conflicts between the contending forces are likely to take.

White Kids

White Kids
Available:
Author: Margaret A. Hagerman
Pages: 280
ISBN: 9781479802456
Release: 2020-02-01
Editor: NYU Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Winner, 2019 William J. Goode Book Award, given by the Family Section of the American Sociological Association Finalist, 2019 C. Wright Mills Award, given by the Society for the Study of Social Problems Riveting stories of how affluent, white children learn about race American kids are living in a world of ongoing public debates about race, daily displays of racial injustice, and for some, an increased awareness surrounding diversity and inclusion. In this heated context, sociologist Margaret A. Hagerman zeroes in on affluent, white kids to observe how they make sense of privilege, unequal educational opportunities, and police violence. In fascinating detail, Hagerman considers the role that they and their families play in the reproduction of racism and racial inequality in America. White Kids, based on two years of research involving in-depth interviews with white kids and their families, is a clear-eyed and sometimes shocking account of how white kids learn about race. In doing so, this book explores questions such as, “How do white kids learn about race when they grow up in families that do not talk openly about race or acknowledge its impact?” and “What about children growing up in families with parents who consider themselves to be ‘anti-racist’?” Featuring the actual voices of young, affluent white kids and what they think about race, racism, inequality, and privilege, White Kids illuminates how white racial socialization is much more dynamic, complex, and varied than previously recognized. It is a process that stretches beyond white parents’ explicit conversations with their white children and includes not only the choices parents make about neighborhoods, schools, peer groups, extracurricular activities, and media, but also the choices made by the kids themselves. By interviewing kids who are growing up in different racial contexts—from racially segregated to meaningfully integrated and from politically progressive to conservative—this important book documents key differences in the outcomes of white racial socialization across families. And by observing families in their everyday lives, this book explores the extent to which white families, even those with anti-racist intentions, reproduce and reinforce the forms of inequality they say they reject.

Rethinking School Reform

Rethinking School Reform
Available:
Author: Anonim
Pages: 329
ISBN: 1937730468
Release: 2021
Editor: Rethinking Schools

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Multicultural Cities

Multicultural Cities
Available:
Author: Mohammad Abdul Qadeer
Pages: 356
ISBN: 9781442630147
Release: 2016
Editor: University of Toronto Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In Multicultural Cities, Mohammad Abdul Qadeer offers a tour of three of North America's premier multicultural metropolises - Toronto, New York, and Los Angeles

Tales of Two Americas

Tales of Two Americas
Available:
Author: John Freeman
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9781524704827
Release: 2017-09-05
Editor: Penguin

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Thirty-six major contemporary writers examine life in a deeply divided America—including Anthony Doerr, Ann Patchett, Roxane Gay, Rebecca Solnit, Hector Tobar, Joyce Carol Oates, Edwidge Danticat, Richard Russo, Eula Bliss, Karen Russell, and many more America is broken. You don’t need a fistful of statistics to know this. Visit any city, and evidence of our shattered social compact will present itself. From Appalachia to the Rust Belt and down to rural Texas, the gap between the wealthiest and the poorest stretches to unimaginable chasms. Whether the cause of this inequality is systemic injustice, the entrenchment of racism in our culture, the long war on drugs, or immigration policies, it endangers not only the American Dream but our very lives. In Tales of Two Americas, some of the literary world’s most exciting writers look beyond numbers and wages to convey what it feels like to live in this divided nation. Their extraordinarily powerful stories, essays, and poems demonstrate how boundaries break down when experiences are shared, and that in sharing our stories we can help to alleviate a suffering that touches so many people.

Scripted Bodies

Scripted Bodies
Available:
Author: Kenneth J. Saltman
Pages: 124
ISBN: 9781317199335
Release: 2016-07-28
Editor: Routledge

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

From drugging kids into attention and reviving behaviorism to biometric measurements of teaching and learning Scripted Bodies exposes a brave new world of education in the age of repression. Scripted Bodies examines how corporeal control has expanded in education, how it impacts the mind and thinking, and the ways that new technologies are integral to the expansion of control. Scripted Bodies contends that this rise in repression must be understood in relation to the broader economic, political, and cultural forces that have produced an increasingly authoritarian society. This book details how these new forms of corporeal control shut down the possibility of public schools developing as places where thinking becomes the organizing principle needed to contribute to a more equal, just, and democratic society.

The Good American

The Good American
Available:
Author: Robert D. Kaplan
Pages: 544
ISBN: 9780525512301
Release: 2021
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Vietnam, 1966-1969 -- Guatemala, 1970-1977 -- Domenica, El Salvador, and South America, 1979-1983 -- Uganda, Luwero Triangle, 1984 -- South China Sea, 1984-1985 -- Sudan and Chad, 1985 -- Honduras, 1985-1986 -- Mozambique, 1987-1988 -- Ethiopia and Somalia, 1989 -- Liberia by Way of Nicaraqua, 1990-1993 -- Rwanda, 1994 -- Gaza and the West Bank, 1995 -- Bosnia, 1995-1996 -- Northern Uganda by Way of Nicaraqua, 1996-1997 -- From El Salvador to Ecuador and Colombia, by Way of Africa, 1997-2002 and 2008-2009 -- North Korea, 2002 -- Nepal, 2003 -- Micronesia by Way of Iraq, 2003-2008 -- Northern Mexico by Way of Central America, 2010-2013.

American Journal

American Journal
Available:
Author: Tracy K. Smith
Pages: 88
ISBN: 9781555978679
Release: 2018-09-04
Editor: Graywolf Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A landmark anthology envisioned by Tracy K. Smith, Poet Laureate of the United States American Journal presents fifty contemporary poems that explore and celebrate our country and our lives. Poet Laureate of the United States and Pulitzer Prize winner Tracy K. Smith has gathered a remarkable chorus of voices that ring up and down the registers of American poetry. In the elegant arrangement of this anthology, we hear stories from rural communities and urban centers, laments of loss in war and in grief, experiences of immigrants, outcries at injustices, and poems that honor elders, evoke history, and praise our efforts to see and understand one another. Taking its title from a poem by Robert Hayden, the first African American appointed as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, American Journal investigates our time with curiosity, wonder, and compassion. Among the fifty poets included are: Jericho Brown, Eduardo C. Corral, Natalie Diaz, Matthew Dickman, Mark Doty, Ross Gay, Aracelis Girmay, Joy Harjo, Terrance Hayes, Cathy Park Hong, Marie Howe, Major Jackson, Ilya Kaminsky, Robin Coste Lewis, Ada Límon, Layli Long Soldier, Erika L. Sánchez, Solmaz Sharif, Danez Smith, Susan Stewart, Mary Szybist, Natasha Trethewey, Brian Turner, Charles Wright, and Kevin Young.

Ghosts of the Tsunami

Ghosts of the Tsunami
Available:
Author: Richard Lloyd Parry
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780374710934
Release: 2017-10-24
Editor: MCD

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Named one of the best books of 2017 by The Guardian, NPR, GQ, The Economist, Bookforum, Amazon, and Lit Hub The definitive account of what happened, why, and above all how it felt, when catastrophe hit Japan—by the Japan correspondent of The Times (London) and author of People Who Eat Darkness On March 11, 2011, a powerful earthquake sent a 120-foot-high tsunami smashing into the coast of northeast Japan. By the time the sea retreated, more than eighteen thousand people had been crushed, burned to death, or drowned. It was Japan’s greatest single loss of life since the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. It set off a national crisis and the meltdown of a nuclear power plant. And even after the immediate emergency had abated, the trauma of the disaster continued to express itself in bizarre and mysterious ways. Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, lived through the earthquake in Tokyo and spent six years reporting from the disaster zone. There he encountered stories of ghosts and hauntings, and met a priest who exorcised the spirits of the dead. And he found himself drawn back again and again to a village that had suffered the greatest loss of all, a community tormented by unbearable mysteries of its own. What really happened to the local children as they waited in the schoolyard in the moments before the tsunami? Why did their teachers not evacuate them to safety? And why was the unbearable truth being so stubbornly covered up? Ghosts of the Tsunami is a soon-to-be classic intimate account of an epic tragedy, told through the accounts of those who lived through it. It tells the story of how a nation faced a catastrophe, and the struggle to find consolation in the ruins.

Ghosts I Have Been

Ghosts I Have Been
Available:
Author: Richard Peck
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781101664353
Release: 2001-04-23
Editor: Penguin

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Upon discovering that she has the gift of Second Sight, Blossom also learns that whether glimpsing the future or traveling into the past, one is powerless to alter history.

Teach Freedom

Teach Freedom
Available:
Author: Charles M. Payne,Carol Sills Strickland,William Ayers,Therese Quinn
Pages: 272
ISBN: UOM:39015073942370
Release: 2008-04-12
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Presents a collection of essays that explore the African American educational experience and how education was used as a tool for collective liberation.

Unequal City

Unequal City
Available:
Author: Carla Shedd
Pages: 241
ISBN: 9781610448529
Release: 2015-10-20
Editor: Russell Sage Foundation

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Chicago has long struggled with racial residential segregation, high rates of poverty, and deepening class stratification, and it can be a challenging place for adolescents to grow up. Unequal City examines the ways in which Chicago’s most vulnerable residents navigate their neighborhoods, life opportunities, and encounters with the law. In this pioneering analysis of the intersection of race, place, and opportunity, sociologist and criminal justice expert Carla Shedd illuminates how schools either reinforce or ameliorate the social inequalities that shape the worlds of these adolescents. Shedd draws from an array of data and in-depth interviews with Chicago youth to offer new insight into this understudied group. Focusing on four public high schools with differing student bodies, Shedd reveals how the predominantly low-income African American students at one school encounter obstacles their more affluent, white counterparts on the other side of the city do not face. Teens often travel long distances to attend school which, due to Chicago’s segregated and highly unequal neighborhoods, can involve crossing class, race, and gang lines. As Shedd explains, the disadvantaged teens who traverse these boundaries daily develop a keen “perception of injustice,” or the recognition that their economic and educational opportunities are restricted by their place in the social hierarchy. Adolescents’ worldviews are also influenced by encounters with law enforcement while traveling to school and during school hours. Shedd tracks the rise of metal detectors, surveillance cameras, and pat-downs at certain Chicago schools. Along with police procedures like stop-and-frisk, these prison-like practices lead to distrust of authority and feelings of powerlessness among the adolescents who experience mistreatment either firsthand or vicariously. Shedd finds that the racial composition of the student body profoundly shapes students’ perceptions of injustice. The more diverse a school is, the more likely its students of color will recognize whether they are subject to discriminatory treatment. By contrast, African American and Hispanic youth whose schools and neighborhoods are both highly segregated and highly policed are less likely to understand their individual and group disadvantage due to their lack of exposure to youth of differing backgrounds.

Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue

Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue
Available:
Author: Chara Haeussler Bohan
Pages: 333
ISBN: 9781641133838
Release: 2018-08-01
Editor: IAP

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue is a peer-reviewed journal sponsored by the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum. The purpose of the journal is to promote the scholarly study of teaching and curriculum. The aim is to provide readers with knowledge and strategies of teaching and curriculum that can be used in educational settings. The journal is published annually in two volumes and includes traditional research papers, conceptual essays, as well as research outtakes and book reviews. Publication in CTD is always free to authors. Information about the journal is located on the AATC website http://aatchome.org/ and can be found on the Journal tab at http://aatchome.org/about-ctd-journal/