Black Marxism

Black Marxism
Available:
Author: Cedric J. Robinson
Pages: 480
ISBN: 0807876127
Release: 2005-10-12
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In this ambitious work, first published in 1983, Cedric Robinson demonstrates that efforts to understand black people's history of resistance solely through the prism of Marxist theory are incomplete and inaccurate. Marxist analyses tend to presuppose European models of history and experience that downplay the significance of black people and black communities as agents of change and resistance. Black radicalism must be linked to the traditions of Africa and the unique experiences of blacks on western continents, Robinson argues, and any analyses of African American history need to acknowledge this. To illustrate his argument, Robinson traces the emergence of Marxist ideology in Europe, the resistance by blacks in historically oppressive environments, and the influence of both of these traditions on such important twentieth-century black radical thinkers as W. E. B. Du Bois, C. L. R. James, and Richard Wright.

Black Marxism

Black Marxism
Available:
Author: Cedric J. Robinson
Pages: 496
ISBN: 9780141996783
Release: 2021-02-04
Editor: Penguin UK

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

'A towering achievement. There is simply nothing like it in the history of Black radical thought' Cornel West 'Cedric Robinson's brilliant analyses revealed new ways of thinking and acting' Angela Davis 'This work is about our people's struggle, the historical Black struggle' Any struggle must be fought on a people's own terms, argues Cedric Robinson's landmark account of Black radicalism. Marxism is a western construction, and therefore inadequate to describe the significance of Black communities as agents of change against 'racial capitalism'. Tracing the emergence of European radicalism, the history of Black African resistance and the influence of these on such key thinkers as W. E. B. Du Bois, C. L. R. James and Richard Wright, Black Marxism reclaims the story of a movement.

Black Marxism

Black Marxism
Available:
Author: Cedric J. Robinson
Pages: 496
ISBN: 1469663724
Release: 2020-12
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In this ambitious work, first published in 1983, Cedric Robinson demonstrates that efforts to understand Black people's history of resistance solely through the prism of Marxist theory are incomplete and inaccurate. Marxist analyses tend to presuppose European models of history and experience that downplay the significance of Black people and Black communities as agents of change and resistance. Black radicalism, Robinson argues, must be linked to the traditions of Africa and the unique experiences of Blacks on western continents, and any analyses of African American history need to acknowledge this. To illustrate his argument, Robinson traces the emergence of Marxist ideology in Europe, the resistance by Blacks in historically oppressive environments, and the influence of both of these traditions on such important twentieth-century Black radical thinkers as W. E. B. Du Bois, C. L. R. James, and Richard Wright. This revised and updated third edition includes a new preface by Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, and a new foreword by Robin D. G. Kelley.

The Black Book of Communism

The Black Book of Communism
Available:
Author: G. Peter Albert,Stéphane Courtois,Nicolas Werth,Andrzej Paczkowski,Jean-Louis Panné,Karel Bartosek,Jean-Louis Margolin
Pages: 858
ISBN: 0674076087
Release: 1999
Editor: Harvard University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Collects and analyzes seventy years of communist crimes that offer details on Kim Sung's Korea, Vietnam under "Uncle Ho," and Cuba under Castro.

Left of Karl Marx

Left of Karl Marx
Available:
Author: Carole Boyce Davies
Pages: 344
ISBN: 9780822390329
Release: 2008-01-15
Editor: Duke University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In Left of Karl Marx, Carole Boyce Davies assesses the activism, writing, and legacy of Claudia Jones (1915–1964), a pioneering Afro-Caribbean radical intellectual, dedicated communist, and feminist. Jones is buried in London’s Highgate Cemetery, to the left of Karl Marx—a location that Boyce Davies finds fitting given how Jones expanded Marxism-Leninism to incorporate gender and race in her political critique and activism. Claudia Cumberbatch Jones was born in Trinidad. In 1924, she moved to New York, where she lived for the next thirty years. She was active in the Communist Party from her early twenties onward. A talented writer and speaker, she traveled throughout the United States lecturing and organizing. In the early 1950s, she wrote a well-known column, “Half the World,” for the Daily Worker. As the U.S. government intensified its efforts to prosecute communists, Jones was arrested several times. She served nearly a year in a U.S. prison before being deported and given asylum by Great Britain in 1955. There she founded The West Indian Gazette and Afro-Asian Caribbean News and the Caribbean Carnival, an annual London festival that continues today as the Notting Hill Carnival. Boyce Davies examines Jones’s thought and journalism, her political and community organizing, and poetry that the activist wrote while she was imprisoned. Looking at the contents of the FBI file on Jones, Boyce Davies contrasts Jones’s own narration of her life with the federal government’s. Left of Karl Marx establishes Jones as a significant figure within Caribbean intellectual traditions, black U.S. feminism, and the history of communism.

From Class to Race

From Class to Race
Available:
Author: Charles Mills
Pages: 312
ISBN: 9780742580886
Release: 2003-11-19
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In From Class to Race, Charles Mills maps the theoretical route that brought him to the innovative conceptual framework outlined in his academic bestseller The Racial Contract (1997). Mills argues for a new critical theory that develops the insights of the black radical political tradition. While challenging conventional interpretations of key Marxist concepts and claims, the author contends that Marxism has been 'white' insofar as it has failed to recognize the centrality of race and white supremacy to the making of the modern world. By appealing to both mainstream liberal values and the structuralism traditionally associated with the left, Mills asserts that critical race theory can radicalize the mainstream Enlightenment and develop a new kind of contractarianism that deals frontally with race and other forms of social oppression rather than evading them.

Black Marxism and American Constitutionalism

Black Marxism and American Constitutionalism
Available:
Author: Malik Simba
Pages: 390
ISBN: 1524963267
Release: 2018-11-20
Editor: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Futures of Black Radicalism

Futures of Black Radicalism
Available:
Author: Gaye Theresa Johnson,Alex Lubin
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9781784787578
Release: 2017-08-29
Editor: Verso Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

With racial justice struggles on the rise, a probing collection considers the past and future of Black radicalism Black rebellion has returned. Dramatic protests have risen up in scores of cities and campuses; there is renewed engagement with the history of Black radical movements and thought. Here, key intellectuals—inspired by the new movements and by the seminal work of the scholar Cedric J. Robinson—recall the powerful tradition of Black radicalism while defining new directions for the activists and thinkers it inspires. In a time when activists in Ferguson, Palestine, Baltimore, and Hong Kong immediately connect across vast distances, this book makes clear that new Black radical politics is thoroughly internationalist and redraws the links between Black resistance and anti-capitalism. Featuring the key voices in this new intellectual wave, this collection outlines one of the most vibrant areas of thought today. With contributions from Greg Burris, Jordan T. Camp, Angela Davis, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Avery F. Gordon, Stefano Harney, Christina Heatherton, Robin D.G. Kelley, George Lipsitz, Fred Moten, Paul Ortiz, Steven Osuna, Kwame M. Phillips, Shana L. Redmond, Cedric J. Robinson, Elizabeth P. Robinson, Nikhil Pal Singh, Damien M. Sojoyner, Darryl C. Thomas, and Françoise Vergès.

Cedric J Robinson

Cedric J  Robinson
Available:
Author: Cedric J. Robinson
Pages: 400
ISBN: 0745340024
Release: 2019-10-20
Editor: Black Critique

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A collection of essays by the influential founder of the black radical tradition

Claude McKay Code Name Sasha

Claude McKay  Code Name Sasha
Available:
Author: Gary Edward Holcomb
Pages: 273
ISBN: 0813034507
Release: 2009-08-30
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"Sasha" was the code name adopted by Harlem Renaissance writer Claude McKay (1889-1948) to foil investigations of his life and work. Over a period of two decades, the FBI, U.S. State Department, British police and intelligence, and French law enforcement and colonial authorities took turns harassing McKay, an openly gay, Marxist, Jamaican expatriate who had left the United States and was living in Europe. In this study of four of McKay's texts--the first literary, cultural, and historical analysis to address the multilayered "queer black anarchism" in McKay's writings--Holcomb argues that McKay's "fringe" perspective not only targeted him for investigation but also contributed to a declining literary reputation. Perceived as mystifying and unacceptable because of his dedication to communism, McKay is perplexing and difficult to classify within the traditional constructs of the Harlem Renaissance. The problem that McKay's transnational, aesthetically itinerant writing inevitably has posed is where to locate him. In recent years, access into McKay's work has been transformed by new methods of interpreting the politics of literary texts, the growing significance of transnationality in literary and cultural analysis, and the impact of "queer theory." Holcomb analyzes three of the most important works in McKay's career--the Jazz Age bestseller "Home to Harlem," the negritude manifesto Banjo, and the unpublished "Romance in Marseille." Holcomb uncovers ways in which "Home to Harlem" assembles a homefront queer black anarchism, and treats Banjo as a novel that portrays Marxist internationalist sexual dissidence. Among the most notable contributions to black modernist study, Holcomb's scholarship is the first to assess the consequence of McKay's landmark "Romance in Marseille," a text that is, despite its absence from broad public access for nearly 80 years, conceivably the most significant early black diaspora text. Finally, he examines McKay's extensive FBI file and his late-1930s autobiography, "A Long Way from Home," in which McKay disguises his past as a means of eluding his harassers. The memoir is essential to understanding McKay's first three novels. Relying on queer theory and related language-oriented approaches, moreover, this study emphasizes that the key to McKay's queer black Marxism lies as much in confronting his textual absence as it does in rereading the author historically.

Marxism and Intersectionality

Marxism and Intersectionality
Available:
Author: Ashley J. Bohrer
Pages: 280
ISBN: 9783839441602
Release: 2019-08-31
Editor: transcript Verlag

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

What does the development of a truly robust contemporary theory of domination require? Ashley J. Bohrer argues that it is only by considering all of the dimensions of race, gender, sexuality, and class within the structures of capitalism and imperialism that we can understand power relations as we find them nowadays. Bohrer explains how many of the purported incompatibilities between Marxism and intersectionality arise more from miscommunication rather than a fundamental conceptual antagonism. As the first monograph entirely devoted to this issue, »Marxism and Intersectionality« serves as a tool to activists and academics working against multiple systems of domination, exploitation, and oppression.

Marxism Reparations and the Black Freedom Struggle

Marxism  Reparations and the Black Freedom Struggle
Available:
Author: Monica Moorehead
Pages: 197
ISBN: 0895671379
Release: 2007-07-01
Editor: World View Forum Pub

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

From the daily instances of police brutality and racial profiling to the government’s callous disregard of poor and mainly African American people in the wake of the Hurricane Katrina, this remarkable book identifies the continuing struggles for justice among a society still permeated with the racism, oppression, and economic, political, and social discrimination that resulted from the horrendous transatlantic slave trade. Illuminating the often forgotten history of this diaspora and the legacy of brutal prejudice that stemmed from it, this critical argument discusses the fight for reparations within the United States as well as among the peoples of Africa and the Caribbean.

Want to Start a Revolution

Want to Start a Revolution
Available:
Author: Dayo F. Gore,Jeanne Theoharis,Komozi Woodard
Pages: 353
ISBN: 9780814783146
Release: 2009-12
Editor: NYU Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, or rank and file party members. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman? From Rosa Parks and Esther Cooper Jackson, to Shirley Graham DuBois and Assata Shakur, a host of women demonstrated a lifelong commitment to radical change, embracing multiple roles to sustain the movement, founding numerous groups and mentoring younger activists. Helping to create the groundwork and continuity for the movement by operating as local organizers, international mobilizers, and charismatic leaders, the stories of the women profiled in Want to Start a Revolution? help shatter the pervasive and imbalanced image of women on the sidelines of the black freedom struggle. Contributors: Margo Natalie Crawford, Prudence Cumberbatch, Johanna Fernández, Diane C. Fujino, Dayo F. Gore, Joshua Guild, Gerald Horne, Ericka Huggins, Angela D. LeBlanc-Ernest, Joy James, Erik McDuffie, Premilla Nadasen, Sherie M. Randolph, James Smethurst, Margaret Stevens, and Jeanne Theoharis.

Quotations from Chairman Mao Tsetung

Quotations from Chairman Mao Tsetung
Available:
Author: Tse-tung Mao,Zedong Mao
Pages: 311
ISBN: 083512388X
Release: 1990
Editor: China Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Back to Black

Back to Black
Available:
Author: Kehinde Andrews
Pages: 360
ISBN: 9781786992802
Release: 2018-07-10
Editor: Zed Books Ltd.

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

‘Lucid, fluent and compelling’ – Observer ‘We need writers like Andrews ... These are truths we need to be hearing’ – New Statesman Back to Black traces the long and eminent history of Black radical politics. Born out of resistance to slavery and colonialism, its rich past encompasses figures such as Marcus Garvey, Angela Davis, the Black Panthers and the Black Lives Matter activists of today. At its core it argues that racism is inexorably embedded in the fabric of society, and that it can never be overcome unless by enacting change outside of this suffocating system. Yet this Black radicalism has been diluted and moderated over time; wilfully misrepresented and caricatured by others; divested of its legacy, potency, and force. Kehinde Andrews explores the true roots of this tradition and connects the dots to today’s struggles by showing what a renewed politics of Black radicalism might look like in the 21st century.

Ragged Revolutionaries

Ragged Revolutionaries
Available:
Author: Nathaniel Mills
Pages: 208
ISBN: 1625342799
Release: 2017
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The lumpenproletariat was an overlooked, mode of African American Marxism formed during the Great Depression by black writers on the Communist left. Analyzing multiple works from the period, Mills shows how Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and Margaret Walker used the lumpenproletariat to imagine new forms of revolutionary knowledge and agency.

Black Marxism

Black Marxism
Available:
Author: Cedric J. Robinson
Pages: 487
ISBN: STANFORD:36105037573776
Release: 1983
Editor: Zed Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

In this ambitious work, first published in 1983, Cedric Robinson demonstrates that efforts to understand black people's history of resistance solely through the prism of Marxist theory are incomplete and inaccurate. Marxist analyses tend to presuppose European models of history and experience that downplay the significance of black people and black communities as agents of change and resistance. Black radicalism must be linked to the traditions of Africa and the unique experiences of blacks on western continents, Robinson argues, and any analyses of African American history need to acknowledge this. To illustrate his argument, Robinson traces the emergence of Marxist ideology in Europe, the resistance by blacks in historically oppressive environments, and the influence of both of these traditions on such important twentieth-century black radical thinkers as W. E. B. Du Bois, C. L. R. James, and Richard Wright.

Black Intellectual Thought in Modern America

Black Intellectual Thought in Modern America
Available:
Author: Brian D. Behnken,Gregory D. Smithers,Simon Wendt
Pages: 252
ISBN: 9781496813664
Release: 2017-09-07
Editor: Univ. Press of Mississippi

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Contributions by Tunde Adeleke, Brian D. Behnken, Minkah Makalani, Benita Roth, Gregory D. Smithers, Simon Wendt, and Danielle L. Wiggins Black intellectualism has been misunderstood by the American public and by scholars for generations. Historically maligned by their peers and by the lay public as inauthentic or illegitimate, black intellectuals have found their work misused, ignored, or discarded. Black intellectuals have also been reductively placed into one or two main categories: they are usually deemed liberal or, less frequently, as conservative. The contributors to this volume explore several prominent intellectuals, from left-leaning leaders such as W. E. B. Du Bois to conservative intellectuals like Thomas Sowell, from well-known black feminists such as Patricia Hill Collins to Marxists like Claudia Jones, to underscore the variety of black intellectual thought in the United States. Contributors also situate the development of the lines of black intellectual thought within the broader history from which these trends emerged. The result gathers essays that offer entry into a host of rich intellectual traditions.

Class Race and Marxism

Class  Race  and Marxism
Available:
Author: David R. Roediger
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9781786631244
Release: 2019-10-08
Editor: Verso

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Winner of the Working-Class Studies Association C.L.R. James Award Seen as a pioneering figure in the critical study of whiteness, US historian David Roediger has sometimes received criticism, and praise, alleging that he left Marxism behind in order to work on questions of identity. This volume collects his recent and new work implicitly and explicitly challenging such a view. In his historical studies of the intersections of race, settler colonialism, and slavery, in his major essay (with Elizabeth Esch) on race and the management of labor, in his detailing of the origins of critical studies of whiteness within Marxism, and in his reflections on the history of solidarity, Roediger argues that racial division is part of not only of the history of capitalism but also of the logic of capital.

White Fragility

White Fragility
Available:
Author: Robin DiAngelo
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9780807047422
Release: 2018-06-26
Editor: Beacon Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.