Bind Us Apart

Bind Us Apart
Available:
Author: Nicholas Guyatt
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780198796541
Release: 2016-08-25
Editor: Oxford University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The study of USA's on-going failure to achieve true racial integration, Bind Us Apart shows how, from the Revolution through to the Civil War, white American anti-slavery reformers failed to forge a colour-blind society.

Bind Us Apart

Bind Us Apart
Available:
Author: Nicholas Guyatt
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780465065615
Release: 2016-04-26
Editor: Basic Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Indians in their cherished proposition that “all men are created equal”? Racism is the usual answer. Yet Nicholas Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart that white liberals from the founding to the Civil War were not confident racists, but tortured reformers conscious of the damage that racism would do to the nation. Many tried to build a multiracial America in the early nineteenth century, but ultimately adopted the belief that non-whites should create their own republics elsewhere: in an Indian state in the West, or a colony for free blacks in Liberia. Herein lie the origins of “separate but equal.” Essential reading for anyone hoping to understand today's racial tensions, Bind Us Apart reveals why racial justice in the United States continues to be an elusive goal: despite our best efforts, we have never been able to imagine a fully inclusive, multiracial society.

Bind Us Apart

Bind Us Apart
Available:
Author: Nicholas Guyatt
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780192516626
Release: 2016-08-18
Editor: Oxford University Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The surprising and counterintuitive origins of America's racial crisis Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Indians in their cherished proposition that "all men are created equal"? The usual answer is racism, but the reality is more complex and unsettling. In Bind Us Apart, historian Nicholas Guyatt argues that, from the Revolution through the Civil War, most white liberals believed in the unity of all human beings. But their philosophy faltered when it came to the practical work of forging a colour-blind society. Unable to convince others - and themselves - that racial mixing was viable, white reformers began instead to claim that people of colour could only thrive in separate republics: in Native states in the American West or in the West African colony of Liberia. Herein lie the origins of "separate but equal." Decades before Reconstruction, America's liberal elite was unable to imagine how people of colour could become citizens of the United States. Throughout the nineteenth century, Native Americans were pushed farther and farther westward, while four million slaves freed after the Civil War found themselves among a white population that had spent decades imagining that they would live somewhere else.

Bind Us Apart How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation

Bind Us Apart  How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation
Available:
Author: Anonim
Pages: 329
ISBN: OCLC:1053704033
Release: 2017
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The Broken Heart of America

The Broken Heart of America
Available:
Author: Walter Johnson
Pages: 528
ISBN: 9781541646063
Release: 2020-04-14
Editor: Basic Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A searing portrait of the racial dynamics that lie inescapably at the heart of our nation, told through the turbulent history of the city of St. Louis. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, American history has been made in St. Louis. And as Walter Johnson shows in this searing book, the city exemplifies how imperialism, racism, and capitalism have persistently entwined to corrupt the nation's past. St. Louis was a staging post for Indian removal and imperial expansion, and its wealth grew on the backs of its poor black residents, from slavery through redlining and urban renewal. But it was once also America's most radical city, home to anti-capitalist immigrants, the Civil War's first general emancipation, and the nation's first general strike -- a legacy of resistance that endures. A blistering history of a city's rise and decline, The Broken Heart of America will forever change how we think about the United States.

Ties That Bind

Ties That Bind
Available:
Author: Marie Bostwick
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780758279828
Release: 2012-05-01
Editor: Kensington Publishing Corp.

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"A touching story..." – Bestselling author Patricia Gaffney In her compelling, beautifully crafted novel, New York Times bestselling author Marie Bostwick celebrates friendships old and new--and the unlikely threads that sometimes lead us exactly where we need to be. . . Christmas is fast approaching, and New Bern, Connecticut, is about to receive the gift of a new pastor, hired sight unseen to fill in while Reverend Tucker is on sabbatical. Meanwhile, Margot Matthews' friend, Abigail, is trying to match-make even though Margot has all but given up on romance. She loves her job at the Cobbled Court Quilt Shop and the life and friendships she's made in New Bern; she just never thought she'd still be single on her fortieth birthday. It's a shock to the entire town when Phillip A. Clarkson turns out to be Philippa. Truth be told, not everyone is happy about having a female pastor. Yet despite a rocky start, Philippa begins to settle in--finding ways to ease the townspeople's burdens, joining the quilting circle, and forging a fast friendship with Margot. When tragedy threatens to tear Margot's family apart, that bond--and the help of her quilting sisterhood--will prove a saving grace. And as she untangles her feelings for another new arrival in town, Margot begins to realize that it is the surprising detours woven into life's fabric that provide its richest hues and deepest meaning. . . "This is one very talented writer...watch her star rise!" --Debbie Macomber

Stories That Bind Us

Stories That Bind Us
Available:
Author: Susie Finkbeiner
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9781493423187
Release: 2020-06-02
Editor: Revell

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Betty Sweet never expected to be a widow at 40. With so much life still in front of her, she tries to figure out what's next. She couldn't have imagined what God had in mind. When her estranged sister is committed to a sanitarium, Betty finds herself taking on the care of a 5-year-old nephew she never knew she had. In 1960s LaFontaine, Michigan, they make an odd pair. Betty with her pink button nose and bouffant hair. Hugo with his light brown skin and large brown eyes. But more powerful than what makes them different is what they share: the heartache of an empty space in their lives. Slowly, they will learn to trust one another as they discover common ground and healing through the magic of storytelling. Award-winning author Susie Finkbeiner offers fans a novel that invites us to rediscover the power of story to open the doors of our hearts.

Stamped from the Beginning

Stamped from the Beginning
Available:
Author: Ibram X. Kendi
Pages: 592
ISBN: 9781568584645
Release: 2016-04-12
Editor: Bold Type Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society. Some Americans insist that we're living in a post-racial society. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America -- it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis. As Kendi shows, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. They were created to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial inequities. In shedding light on this history, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose racist thinking. In the process, he gives us reason to hope.

Never Tear Us Apart

Never Tear Us Apart
Available:
Author: Monica Murphy
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9781101967287
Release: 2016
Editor: Bantam

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

"Katie Watts was almost thirteen when she was kidnapped at an amusement park. Held captive for days, she's finally rescued by her captor's teenage son, Will, who's been subjected to his father's mental and physical abuse for years. In the aftermath, Katie was sent into seclusion with her family, and Will was shipped off to one foster home after another, completely disappearing from her life. Fast forward to present day and Katherine is ready to tell her story on primetime news. She believed talking about it would help purge all the self hatred and devastation once and for all. But she was wrong"--

Molecular Biology of the Cell

Molecular Biology of the Cell
Available:
Author: Bruce Alberts
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0815332181
Release: 2004
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

The Lies that Bind Rethinking Identity

The Lies that Bind  Rethinking Identity
Available:
Author: Kwame Anthony Appiah
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781631493843
Release: 2018-08-28
Editor: Liveright Publishing

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A Washington Post Notable Book of the Year As seen on the Netflix series Explained From the best-selling author of Cosmopolitanism comes this revealing exploration of how the collective identities that shape our polarized world are riddled with contradiction. Who do you think you are? That’s a question bound up in another: What do you think you are? Gender. Religion. Race. Nationality. Class. Culture. Such affiliations give contours to our sense of self, and shape our polarized world. Yet the collective identities they spawn are riddled with contradictions, and cratered with falsehoods. Kwame Anthony Appiah’s The Lies That Bind is an incandescent exploration of the nature and history of the identities that define us. It challenges our assumptions about how identities work. We all know there are conflicts between identities, but Appiah shows how identities are created by conflict. Religion, he demonstrates, gains power because it isn’t primarily about belief. Our everyday notions of race are the detritus of discarded nineteenth-century science. Our cherished concept of the sovereign nation—of self-rule—is incoherent and unstable. Class systems can become entrenched by efforts to reform them. Even the very idea of Western culture is a shimmering mirage. From Anton Wilhelm Amo, the eighteenth-century African child who miraculously became an eminent European philosopher before retiring back to Africa, to Italo Svevo, the literary marvel who changed citizenship without leaving home, to Appiah’s own father, Joseph, an anticolonial firebrand who was ready to give his life for a nation that did not yet exist, Appiah interweaves keen-edged argument with vibrant narratives to expose the myths behind our collective identities. These “mistaken identities,” Appiah explains, can fuel some of our worst atrocities—from chattel slavery to genocide. And yet, he argues that social identities aren’t something we can simply do away with. They can usher in moral progress and bring significance to our lives by connecting the small scale of our daily existence with larger movements, causes, and concerns. Elaborating a bold and clarifying new theory of identity, The Lies That Bind is a ringing philosophical statement for the anxious, conflict-ridden twenty-first century. This book will transform the way we think about who—and what—“we” are.

Anointed with Oil

Anointed with Oil
Available:
Author: Darren Dochuk
Pages: 688
ISBN: 9781541673946
Release: 2019-06-04
Editor: Basic Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A groundbreaking new history of the United States, showing how Christian faith and the pursuit of petroleum fueled America's rise to global power and shaped today's political clashes Anointed with Oil places religion and oil at the center of American history. As prize-winning historian Darren Dochuk reveals, from the earliest discovery of oil in America during the Civil War, citizens saw oil as the nation's special blessing and its peculiar burden, the source of its prophetic mission in the world. Over the century that followed and down to the present day, the oil industry's leaders and its ordinary workers together fundamentally transformed American religion, business, and politics -- boosting America's ascent as the preeminent global power, giving shape to modern evangelical Christianity, fueling the rise of the Republican Right, and setting the terms for today's political and environmental debates. Ranging from the Civil War to the present, from West Texas to Saudi Arabia to the Alberta Tar Sands, and from oil-patch boomtowns to the White House, this is a sweeping, magisterial book that transforms how we understand our nation's history.

Janeway s Immunobiology

Janeway s Immunobiology
Available:
Author: Murphy, Kenneth M.,Weaver, Casey
Pages: 904
ISBN: 9780815345510
Release: 2016-03-22
Editor: W.W. Norton & Company

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Explore the premier text for immunology at the advanced undergraduate, graduate, and medical school levels. Beginning students appreciate the bookÕs clear writing and informative illustrations, while advanced students and working immunologists value its comprehensive scope and depth. This edition is thoroughly revised and up to date with significant developments in the field, especially on the topic of innate immunity.

The Threat of Pandemic Influenza

The Threat of Pandemic Influenza
Available:
Author: Institute of Medicine,Board on Global Health,Forum on Microbial Threats
Pages: 430
ISBN: 9780309095044
Release: 2005-04-09
Editor: National Academies Press

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Public health officials and organizations around the world remain on high alert because of increasing concerns about the prospect of an influenza pandemic, which many experts believe to be inevitable. Moreover, recent problems with the availability and strain-specificity of vaccine for annual flu epidemics in some countries and the rise of pandemic strains of avian flu in disparate geographic regions have alarmed experts about the world's ability to prevent or contain a human pandemic. The workshop summary, The Threat of Pandemic Influenza: Are We Ready? addresses these urgent concerns. The report describes what steps the United States and other countries have taken thus far to prepare for the next outbreak of "killer flu." It also looks at gaps in readiness, including hospitals' inability to absorb a surge of patients and many nations' incapacity to monitor and detect flu outbreaks. The report points to the need for international agreements to share flu vaccine and antiviral stockpiles to ensure that the 88 percent of nations that cannot manufacture or stockpile these products have access to them. It chronicles the toll of the H5N1 strain of avian flu currently circulating among poultry in many parts of Asia, which now accounts for the culling of millions of birds and the death of at least 50 persons. And it compares the costs of preparations with the costs of illness and death that could arise during an outbreak.

Things Fall Apart

Things Fall Apart
Available:
Author: Chinua Achebe
Pages: 176
ISBN: 9780141393964
Release: 2013-04-25
Editor: Penguin UK

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

One of the BBC's '100 Novels That Shaped Our World' A worldwide bestseller and the first part of Achebe's African Trilogy, Things Fall Apart is the compelling story of one man's battle to protect his community against the forces of change Okonkwo is the greatest wrestler and warrior alive, and his fame spreads throughout West Africa like a bush-fire in the harmattan. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With his world thrown radically off-balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy. First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe's stark, coolly ironic novel reshaped both African and world literature, and has sold over ten million copies in forty-five languages. This arresting parable of a proud but powerless man witnessing the ruin of his people begins Achebe's landmark trilogy of works chronicling the fate of one African community, continued in Arrow of God and No Longer at Ease. 'His courage and generosity are made manifest in the work' Toni Morrison 'The writer in whose company the prison walls fell down' Nelson Mandela 'A great book, that bespeaks a great, brave, kind, human spirit' John Updike With an Introduction by Biyi Bandele

The Sins That Bind Us

The Sins That Bind Us
Available:
Author: Geneva Lee
Pages: 286
ISBN: 1945163186
Release: 2018-11-09
Editor: Unknown

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Can love last between two recovering addicts?

The Revisioners

The Revisioners
Available:
Author: Margaret Wilkerson Sexton
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781640092594
Release: 2019-11-05
Editor: Catapult

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

This New York Times Book Review Notable Book of the Year is "a powerful tale of racial tensions across generations" (People) that explores the depths of women’s relationships—powerful women and marginalized women, healers and survivors. In 1924, Josephine is the proud owner of a thriving farm. As a child, she channeled otherworldly power to free herself from slavery. Now her new neighbor, a white woman named Charlotte, seeks her company, and an uneasy friendship grows between them. But Charlotte has also sought solace in the Ku Klux Klan, a relationship that jeopardizes Josephine’s family. Nearly one hundred years later, Josephine’s descendant, Ava, is a single mother who has just lost her job. She moves in with her white grandmother, Martha, a wealthy but lonely woman who pays Ava to be her companion. But Martha’s behavior soon becomes erratic, then threatening, and Ava must escape before her story and Josephine’s converge. The Revisioners explores the depths of women’s relationships—powerful women and marginalized women, healers and survivors. It is a novel about the bonds between mothers and their children, the dangers that upend those bonds. At its core, The Revisioners ponders generational legacies, the endurance of hope, and the undying promise of freedom. "[A] stunning new novel . . . Sexton’s writing is clear and uncluttered, the dialogue authentic, with all the cadences of real speech . . . This is a novel about the women, the mothers." ―The New York Times Book Review

A Traitor to His Species

A Traitor to His Species
Available:
Author: Ernest Freeberg
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9781541674165
Release: 2020-09-22
Editor: Basic Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

From an award-winning historian, the outlandish story of the man who gave rights to animals. In Gilded Age America, people and animals lived cheek-by-jowl in environments that were dirty and dangerous to man and beast alike. The industrial city brought suffering, but it also inspired a compassion for animals that fueled a controversial anti-cruelty movement. From the center of these debates, Henry Bergh launched a shocking campaign to grant rights to animals. A Traitor to His Species is revelatory social history, awash with colorful characters. Cheered on by thousands of men and women who joined his cause, Bergh fought with robber barons, Five Points gangs, and legendary impresario P.T. Barnum, as they pushed for new laws to protect trolley horses, livestock, stray dogs, and other animals. Raucous and entertaining, A Traitor to His Species tells the story of a remarkable man who gave voice to the voiceless and shaped our modern relationship with animals.

The Impossible Presidency

The Impossible Presidency
Available:
Author: Jeremi Suri
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780465093908
Release: 2017-09-12
Editor: Basic Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

A bold new history of the American presidency, arguing that the successful presidents of the past created unrealistic expectations for every president since JFK, with enormously problematic implications for American politics In The Impossible Presidency, celebrated historian Jeremi Suri charts the rise and fall of the American presidency, from the limited role envisaged by the Founding Fathers to its current status as the most powerful job in the world. He argues that the presidency is a victim of its own success-the vastness of the job makes it almost impossible to fulfill the expectations placed upon it. As managers of the world's largest economy and military, contemporary presidents must react to a truly globalized world in a twenty-four-hour news cycle. There is little room left for bold vision. Suri traces America's disenchantment with our recent presidents to the inevitable mismatch between presidential promises and the structural limitations of the office. A masterful reassessment of presidential history, this book is essential reading for anyone trying to understand America's fraught political climate.

The Gunning of America

The Gunning of America
Available:
Author: Pamela Haag
Pages: 528
ISBN: 9780465098569
Release: 2016-04-19
Editor: Basic Books

DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK:

Americans have always loved guns. This special bond was forged during the American Revolution and sanctified by the Second Amendment. It is because of this exceptional relationship that American civilians are more heavily armed than the citizens of any other nation. Or so we’re told. In The Gunning of America, historian Pamela Haag overturns this conventional wisdom. American gun culture, she argues, developed not because the gun was exceptional, but precisely because it was not: guns proliferated in America because throughout most of the nation’s history, they were perceived as an unexceptional commodity, no different than buttons or typewriters. Focusing on the history of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, one of the most iconic arms manufacturers in America, Haag challenges many basic assumptions of how and when America became a gun culture. Under the leadership of Oliver Winchester and his heirs, the company used aggressive, sometimes ingenious sales and marketing techniques to create new markets for their product. Guns have never “sold themselves”; rather, through advertising and innovative distribution campaigns, the gun industry did. Through the meticulous examination of gun industry archives, Haag challenges the myth of a primal bond between Americans and their firearms. Over the course of its 150 year history, the Winchester Repeating Arms Company sold over 8 million guns. But Oliver Winchester—a shirtmaker in his previous career—had no apparent qualms about a life spent arming America. His daughter-in-law Sarah Winchester was a different story. Legend holds that Sarah was haunted by what she considered a vast blood fortune, and became convinced that the ghosts of rifle victims were haunting her. She channeled much of her inheritance, and her conflicted conscience, into a monstrous estate now known as the Winchester Mystery House, where she sought refuge from this ever-expanding army of phantoms. In this provocative and deeply-researched work of narrative history, Haag fundamentally revises the history of arms in America, and in so doing explodes the clichés that have created and sustained our lethal gun culture.